Papua New Guinea Papua New Guinea

A woman sells betel nut and hand-rolled cigarettes on the street in Goroka. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

For Women In Papua New Guinea, Income From Selling Betel Nut Can Come At Heavy Price

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/617682446/617682696" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Angela Kaupa, 54, looks out the doorway of the building in the Eastern Highlands where she shelters victims of domestic abuse. Up to 10 people can sleep on the thin mattresses and blankets that line the floor. A few personal objects are placed along the walls. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

People crowd into a church in the town of Henganofi in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea for a meeting to end violence resulting from sorcery accusations. In the Eastern Highlands, the accusation of sorcery is a vigilante's rallying cry. Nationally, it's believed to be responsible for dozens of deaths every year. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

In Papua New Guinea's Sorcery Wars, A Peacemaker Takes On Her Toughest Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612451247/614243293" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People walk at the site of a landslide near the village of Ekari in Papua New Guinea's highlands region on Tuesday, after a 7.5-magnitude earthquake struck on Monday. Communication blackouts and blocked roads are hampering rescue efforts as Papua New Guinea works to get a better grasp of the damage wrought by a massive earthquake amid fears of its economic impact. Melvin Levongo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Melvin Levongo/AFP/Getty Images

Debris from a massive landslide from Monday's earthquake covers an area in Tabubil township, Papua New Guinea, on Monday following a 7.5 magnitude earthquake early Monday. Luke Purre/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Luke Purre/AP

A handout photo from the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship shows the detention camp at Manus Island in 2012. Some asylum-seekers are heading to the U.S. for resettlement. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

In 1962, a local leader in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea asks Fore men to stop the sorcery that he believes is killing women and children. Courtesy Shirley Lindenbaum hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Shirley Lindenbaum

A view of facilities at the Manus Island Regional Processing Facility in Papua New Guinea in 2012. For years, the facility has been used to indefinitely detain asylum-seekers; Australia and Papua New Guinea have now agreed to close it. Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship via Getty Images

Diamond argues that there are things we can learn from small-scale societies like those found in Papua New Guinea. Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images

Chances are they already speak more languages than you: children from Papua New Guinea's Andai tribe of hunter-gatherers wait for their parents to vote in the village of Kaiam. Over 800 languages are spoken in PNG, a country of about six million people. Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images