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How does nicotine in e-cigarettes affect young brains? Researchers are teasing out answers. Research on young mice and rats shows how nicotine hijacks brain systems involved in learning, memory, impulse control and addiction. Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Vaping Nicotine Can Affect A Teenage Brain

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A colored computerized tomography (CT) scan of an axial section of the brain of a 59-year-old patient with a malignant (cancerous) glioblastoma brain tumor. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

Deadly Brain Cancers Act Like 'Vampires' By Hijacking Normal Cells To Grow

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Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences hide caption

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Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'

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Astrocyte cells like these from the brain of a mouse may differ subtly from those in a human brain. David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People

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Researchers Explore Why Women's Alzheimer's Risk Is Higher Than Men's

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Flashpop/Getty Images

The Best Medicine: Decoding The Hidden Meanings Of Laughter

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The squiggly blue lines visible in the neurons are an Alzheimer's biomarker called tau. The brownish clumps are amyloid plaques. Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health

New Markers For Alzheimer's Disease Could Aid Diagnosis And Speed Up Drug Development

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Michigan State University doctoral student Mike Morrison has a redesign for scientific posters to spell out their main point in big, easy-to-read letters. Courtesy of Mike Morrison hide caption

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Courtesy of Mike Morrison

To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over

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Chris Nickels for NPR

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

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An MRI scan shows signs of atrophy in the brain of a patient with Huntington's disease. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

Experimental Drug For Huntington's Disease Jams Malfunctioning Gene

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Decoded Brain Signals Could Give Voiceless People A Way To Talk

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Ketamine appears to restore faulty connections between brain cells, according to research performed in mice. Kevin Link/Science Source hide caption

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Kevin Link/Science Source

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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Scientists are questioning the evidence about an alleged attack on diplomats at the U.S. Embassy in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Doubts Rise About Evidence That U.S. Diplomats In Cuba Were Attacked

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Given supportive, nurturing conditions, highly reactive "orchid" children can thrive when tackling challenges, pediatrician and author Thomas Boyce says, especially if they have the comfort of a regular routine. Michael H/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael H/Getty Images

Is Your Child An Orchid Or A Dandelion? Unlocking The Science Of Sensitive Kids

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