neuroscience neuroscience
Stories About

neuroscience

Flashpop/Getty Images

The Best Medicine: Decoding The Hidden Meanings Of Laughter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/740890462/740905514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The squiggly blue lines visible in the neurons are an Alzheimer's biomarker called tau. The brownish clumps are amyloid plaques. Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health

New Markers For Alzheimer's Disease Could Aid Diagnosis And Speed Up Drug Development

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/738478841/738724417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michigan State University doctoral student Mike Morrison has a redesign for scientific posters to spell out their main point in big, easy-to-read letters. Courtesy of Mike Morrison hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Mike Morrison

To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/729314248/731795210" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Chris Nickels for NPR

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/724136568/724921486" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An MRI scan shows signs of atrophy in the brain of a patient with Huntington's disease. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Science Photo Library/Science Source

Experimental Drug For Huntington's Disease Jams Malfunctioning Gene

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721788348/721829037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Decoded Brain Signals Could Give Voiceless People A Way To Talk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716790281/716873147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ketamine appears to restore faulty connections between brain cells, according to research performed in mice. Kevin Link/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Link/Science Source

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/712295937/712409247" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707289059/707358237" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists are questioning the evidence about an alleged attack on diplomats at the U.S. Embassy in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ramon Espinosa/AP

Doubts Rise About Evidence That U.S. Diplomats In Cuba Were Attacked

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/704903613/706636144" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Given supportive, nurturing conditions, highly reactive "orchid" children can thrive when tackling challenges, pediatrician and author Thomas Boyce says, especially if they have the comfort of a regular routine. Michael H/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael H/Getty Images

Is Your Child An Orchid Or A Dandelion? Unlocking The Science Of Sensitive Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/699979387/700126425" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Image Source/Getty Images

A Neuroscientist Explores The Biology Of Addiction In 'Never Enough'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/693814827/693942206" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Angela Hsieh/NPR

Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691356272/691394378" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Ariel Davis for NPR

From Fruit Fly To Stink Eye: Searching For Anger's Animal Roots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/688620302/689760988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A scanning electron micrograph shows microglial cells (yellow) ingesting branched oligodendrocyte cells (purple), a process thought to occur in multiple sclerosis. Oligodendrocytes form insulating myelin sheaths around nerve axons in the central nervous system. Dr. John Zajicek/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Dr. John Zajicek/Science Source
Flashpop/Getty Images

Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/679832549/681125058" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Before light reaches these rods and cones in the retina, it passes through some specialized cells that send signals to brain areas that affect whether you feel happy or sad. Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/678342879/679036799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In experiments involving people with epilepsy, targeted zaps of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex region of the brain helped ease depressive symptoms. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Scientists Improve Mood By Stimulating A Brain Area Above The Eyes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/671866099/671996802" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patients awaiting epilepsy surgery agreed to keep a running log of their mood while researchers used tiny wires to monitor electrical activity in their brains. The combination revealed a circuit for sadness. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/665615440/665833078" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How does the brain's working memory actually work? Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/663668407/664211430" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/660504533/660676495" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript