Alzheimer's Alzheimer's
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Alzheimer's

A colorized image of a brain cell from an Alzheimer's patient shows a neurofibrillary tangle (red) inside the cytoplasm (yellow) of the cell. The tangles consist primarily of a protein called tau. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Alzheimer's Disease May Develop Differently In African-Americans, Study Suggests

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Helping a spouse or parent who has dementia steer clear of hazards can include ridding the home of all guns. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Firearms And Dementia: How Do You Convince A Loved One To Give Up Their Guns?

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Getting people of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds into clinical trials is not only a question of equity, doctors say. It's also a scientific imperative to make sure candidate drugs work and are safe in a broad cross-section of people. Richard Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Bailey/Getty Images

Richard Langford, at home in East Nashville, Tenn., still has significant trouble with mental focus and memory issues 10 years after a sudden and serious infection landed him in the hospital ICU for several weeks. Morgan Hornsby for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Hornsby for NPR

When ICU Delirium Leads To Symptoms Of Dementia After Discharge

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Having more than one child is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's, research finds, as is starting menstruation earlier in life than average and menopause later. Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images

Hormone Levels Likely Influence A Woman's Risk Of Alzheimer's, But How?

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Jose and Elaine Belardo's lives were upended last year when he was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

How Soon Is Soon Enough To Learn You Have Alzheimer's?

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Tang Yau Hoong/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Family Caregivers Exchange Tips, Share Stories To Ease Alzheimer's Losses

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A document developed by a New York end-of-life agency permits people who want to avoid the ravages of advanced dementia to make their final wishes known — while they still have the ability to do so. One version requests that all food and fluids be withheld under certain circumstances. Skynesher/Getty Images hide caption

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Skynesher/Getty Images

This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Scientists Explore Ties Between Alzheimer's And Brain's Ancient Immune System

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Enoki mushrooms have been used in Eastern medicine for hundreds of years and are now being studied for their anti-tumor properties. Mary Shattock/Flickr hide caption

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Mary Shattock/Flickr

Mushrooms Are Good For You, But Are They Medicine?

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Bella and Will Doolittle started a podcast to tell their story about Bella's struggle with early-onset Alzheimer's. Brian Mann for NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann for NPR

To Help Others, One Couple Talks About Life With Early-Onset Alzheimer's

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Alzheimer's disease causes atrophy of brain tissue. The discovery that lymph vessels near the brain's surface help remove waste suggests glitches in the lymph system might be involved in Alzheimer's and a variety of other brain diseases. Alfred Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Source

Brain's Link To Immune System Might Help Explain Alzheimer's

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Rats and people may rely on "metamemory" in a variety of different ways, scientists say. For a rat, it's likely about knowing whether you remember that predator in the distance; for people, knowing what we don't know helps us navigate social interactions. fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Rats To Humans, A Brain Knows When It Can't Remember

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Researchers find that dementia patients who engage in activities such as gathering photographs and talking about family see improvements in their quality of life and are less agitated. Owen Franken/Getty Images hide caption

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Owen Franken/Getty Images

Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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A colored magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain of a 76-year-old patient with dementia shows the brain has atrophied and the dark brown fluid-filled spaces have become enlarged. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

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Zephyr/Science Source

Cancer Drug That Might Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Headed For Bigger Tests

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