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When thousands of Hondurans and other Central Americans poured into Tijuana, Aguilar knew he had to do something. "They're from the same streets and cities as us. They're family!" he says. "It wasn't up for discussion, it was simply a matter of going out there and getting these people fed with a taste of home." Tomás Ayuso for NPR hide caption

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Tomás Ayuso for NPR

Juan Antonio Hernández, the brother of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández and a former congressman, was arrested in Miami on Friday. He is accused of collaborating with multiple criminal organizations in Honduras, Colombia and Mexico to smuggle tons of cocaine into the U.S. Orlanda Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlanda Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

Migrants heading toward the U.S. carry Honduran and Guatemalan national flags in Guatemala on Monday. President Trump has threatened to cut off aid to Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador for failing to stop the caravan's journey. Orlando Estrada/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Estrada/AFP/Getty Images

Honduran migrants arrive in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, in a makeshift raft after crossing the Suchiate river, the natural border between Guatemala and Mexico on Monday. Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images

Central American migrants walking to the U.S. start their day departing Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on Sunday. Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the border, thousands of Central American migrants resumed their advance toward the U.S. border early Sunday in southern Mexico. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Thousands of migrants attempted to cross the border from Guatemala into Mexico this week. Many of the migrants have reportedly returned to their home countries of Honduras and Guatemala. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

Honduran migrants walk toward Tecún Umán, a Guatemalan town along the Mexican border, as they leave Guatemala City on Thursday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

A group of older boys, some of whom are gang members, joke around with a younger boy. Neighborhood children are often groomed for gang activity from the age of 6 or 7. At first they may be given small assignments — like buying snacks for gang members or monitoring who's coming in and out of a neighborhood, says Ayuso. Bit by bit, he says, they graduate into bigger responsibilities. Tomas Ayuso hide caption

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Tomas Ayuso

These teenage brothers live in house #9 at the SOS Children's Village in Tela, Honduras. The goal isn't to get them adopted out but to create a family-like setting in the institution. Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR hide caption

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Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR

An Orphanage In Honduras Puts Love At The Top Of Its Priority List

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Families live by a creek in an impoverished neighborhood in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

What Hondurans In The U.S. Can Expect When They're Deported

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Members of the opposition to the administration of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez march on Friday to protest the U.S. government's decision to end the Temporary Protected Status designation for nearly 57,000 people from Honduras. Hernandez called the decision a sovereign issue for Washington, adding that "we deeply lament it." Fernando Antonio/AP hide caption

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Fernando Antonio/AP

A member of a migrant caravan from Central America kisses a baby as they pray in preparation for an asylum request in the U.S., in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico. Edgard Garrido/REUTERS hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/REUTERS

A 2015 photo of MSC Armonia in Malta. The vessel plowed into a dock in Roatan, Honduras on Tuesday, but the cruise operator says there were no injuries and the damage to the ship was minor. Horacio Villalobos - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Horacio Villalobos - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images

Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez gives an speech during a meeting last year in San Salvador, El Salvador. Marlon Gomez/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Marlon Gomez/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images

Construction workers at a site in Miami. Thousands of construction workers in the U.S. face the elimination of their temporary protected status and the prospect of deportation. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Ending Temporary Protection For Foreign Workers Could Hurt U.S. Rebuilding Efforts

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Eric Conn, who was sentenced in absentia to 12 years in prison after fleeing justice this summer, has been arrested in Honduras. He's seen here in a photo released by the Public Ministry of Honduras. Public Ministry of Honduras hide caption

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Public Ministry of Honduras

Supporters of Honduran presidential candidate Salvador Nasralla clash with soldiers and riot police near the Electoral Supreme Court (TSE) on Thursday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

Supporters of Honduran presidential candidate for the Opposition Alliance against the Dictatorship party Salvador Nasralla protest in Tegucigalpa, on Wednesday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images