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Thousands of migrants attempted to cross the border from Guatemala into Mexico this week. Many of the migrants have reportedly returned to their home countries of Honduras and Guatemala. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

Honduran migrants walk toward Tecún Umán, a Guatemalan town along the Mexican border, as they leave Guatemala City on Thursday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

A group of older boys, some of whom are gang members, joke around with a younger boy. Neighborhood children are often groomed for gang activity from the age of 6 or 7. At first they may be given small assignments — like buying snacks for gang members or monitoring who's coming in and out of a neighborhood, says Ayuso. Bit by bit, he says, they graduate into bigger responsibilities. Tomas Ayuso hide caption

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Tomas Ayuso

The Children's Village has several grassy areas where kids can play soccer and other sports. Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR hide caption

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Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR

An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage

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Families live by a creek in an impoverished neighborhood in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

What Hondurans In The U.S. Can Expect When They're Deported

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Members of the opposition to the administration of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez march on Friday to protest the U.S. government's decision to end the Temporary Protected Status designation for nearly 57,000 people from Honduras. Hernandez called the decision a sovereign issue for Washington, adding that "we deeply lament it." Fernando Antonio/AP hide caption

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Fernando Antonio/AP

A member of a migrant caravan from Central America kisses a baby as they pray in preparation for an asylum request in the U.S., in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico. Edgard Garrido/REUTERS hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/REUTERS

A 2015 photo of MSC Armonia in Malta. The vessel plowed into a dock in Roatan, Honduras on Tuesday, but the cruise operator says there were no injuries and the damage to the ship was minor. Horacio Villalobos - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Horacio Villalobos - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images

Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez gives an speech during a meeting last year in San Salvador, El Salvador. Marlon Gomez/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Marlon Gomez/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images

Construction workers at a site in Miami. Thousands of construction workers in the U.S. face the elimination of their temporary protected status and the prospect of deportation. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Ending Temporary Protection For Foreign Workers Could Hurt U.S. Rebuilding Efforts

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Eric Conn, who was sentenced in absentia to 12 years in prison after fleeing justice this summer, has been arrested in Honduras. He's seen here in a photo released by the Public Ministry of Honduras. Public Ministry of Honduras hide caption

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Public Ministry of Honduras

Supporters of Honduran presidential candidate Salvador Nasralla clash with soldiers and riot police near the Electoral Supreme Court (TSE) on Thursday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

Supporters of Honduran presidential candidate for the Opposition Alliance against the Dictatorship party Salvador Nasralla protest in Tegucigalpa, on Wednesday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

A woman spray paints the phrase "Always Alive" below a stenciled image of slain environmental and indigenous rights activist Berta Cáceres in Tegucigalpa. Fernando Antonio/AP hide caption

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Fernando Antonio/AP

Family Of Slain Indigenous Rights Activist Wants U.S. To Stop Funding Honduras

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Berta Cáceres was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2015. Goldman Environmental Prize hide caption

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Goldman Environmental Prize

Berta Cáceres, Honduran Indigenous Rights Leader, Is Murdered

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Menelio Briones, 32, along with his wife, Marinelis Sabillón, 33, and their five children arrive at the El Edén center in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. They were attempting to reach the U.S., but were picked up in Mexico and deported. Patrick Farrell/Miami Herald staff hide caption

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Patrick Farrell/Miami Herald staff

A police officer is silhouetted through the emergency room door at a public hospital in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. With 91 murders per 100,000 people, the Central American nation is often called the most violent in the world. The homicide rate is roughly 20 times that of the U.S. rate, according to a 2011 U.N. report. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

A view of part of the vast Mosquitia jungle in Honduras. A team of explorers, guided by scans made from airplanes, recently discovered an important ancient city in the region. Courtesy of UTL Productions hide caption

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Courtesy of UTL Productions

Explorers Discover Ancient Lost City In Honduran Jungle

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