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Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter begins closing statements during the opioid trial at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla., on Monday, July 15. It's the first public trial to emerge from roughly 2,000 U.S. lawsuits aimed at holding drugmakers accountable for the nation's opioid epidemic. Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman

Pain Meds As Public Nuisance? Oklahoma Tests A Legal Strategy For Opioid Addiction

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Johnson & Johnson faces multiple lawsuits, including one over the opioid epidemic. A reputation for corporate responsibility, dating back to the Tylenol scandal, offers a measure of protection, but no guarantee, analysts say. Mike Blake/Reuters hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters

Johnson & Johnson, Under Fire, Has Track Record Of Weathering Trouble

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Infants' Tylenol comes with a dosing syringe, while Children's Tylenol has a plastic cup. Both contain the same concentration of the active ingredient, acetaminophen. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Tylenol For Infants And Children Is The Same. Why Does 1 Cost 3 Times More?

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According to MarketWatch, Johnson & Johnson "has been fighting more than 9,000 talcum-powder lawsuits with mixed success. It says its signature powder has always been safe and asbestos-free." Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

A California jury awarded a woman $417 million in a case against Johnson & Johnson. The woman claimed that her use of Johnson's Baby Powder led to terminal ovarian cancer. Scientists disagree on how strong a link there is between talc and ovarian cancer. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Does Baby Powder Cause Cancer? A Jury Says Yes. Scientists Aren't So Sure

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The schizophrenia drug Risperdal was at the heart of government investigations into improper marketing that stretched back more than a decade. JB Reed/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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JB Reed/Bloomberg via Getty Images

No more tears, and no more quaternium-15 for Johnson's Baby Shampoo. Mike Clarke/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Clarke/AFP/Getty Images

More than a half-million bottles of Tylenol for babies have been recalled because of complaints about a new system for getting the dose right. The doughnut-like receptacle for the syringe seen in the neck of the bottle can get pushed down into the liquid medicine. Johnson & Johnson hide caption

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Johnson & Johnson