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Flu and COVID-19 vaccinations are now available across the U.S., including at this CVS pharmacy in Palatine, Illinois. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

A seasonal viral stew is brewing with flu, RSV, COVID and more

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Chelsea Beck for NPR

A new flu is spilling over from cows to people in the U.S. How worried should we be?

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It can be hard to find children's fever-reducing medication in some areas. At a Bed Bath & Beyond in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, a few products were in stock while others were sold out. Laurel Wamsley/NPR hide caption

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Laurel Wamsley/NPR

From left: 1) Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a human cell infected with H3N2 flu virus (gold filamentous particles). 2) Scanning electron micrograph of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) virions (colorized blue) that are shedding from the surface of human lung epithelial cells. 3) Transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron virus particles (gold). Science Source/ NIAID hide caption

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Science Source/ NIAID

Experts are concerned Thanksgiving gatherings could accelerate a 'tripledemic'

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Health experts agree that the unseasonably early surges of RSV cases, especially among children, are a consequence of lifting COVID-19 precautions, which served to protect the public from a variety of viruses. AP hide caption

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AP

Gustavo Perez got his influenza vaccine from pharmacist Patricia Pernal in early September during an event hosted by the Chicago Department of Public Health at the city's Southwest Senior Center. This year's flu season may strike earlier and harder than usual, experts warn. A flu shot's your best protection. Scott Olson/ Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/ Getty Images

Health officials are predicting this winter could see an active flu season on top of potential COVID surges. In short, it's a good year to be a respiratory virus. Left: Image of SARS-CoV-2 omicron virus particles (pink) replicating within an infected cell (teal). Right: Image of an inactive H3N2 influenza virus. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

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NIAID/Science Source

Flu is expected to flare up in U.S. this winter, raising fears of a 'twindemic'

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A pharmacy in New York City offers vaccines for COVID-19 and flu. Some researchers argue that the two diseases may pose similar risks of dying for those infected. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Scientists debate how lethal COVID is. Some say it's now less risky than flu

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Waterfowl and the raptors that dine on them, like this bald eagle and snow goose, have both been killed by the new bird flu virus. Jeff Goulden/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Goulden/Getty Images

A worrisome new bird flu is spreading in American birds and may be here to stay

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Joy Ho for NPR

5 Ways To Stop Summer Colds From Making The Rounds In Your Family

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Is that sneezing or coughing fit a sign of allergies, a cold, the flu or COVID-19? If you also have a fever — a temperature above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher — those symptoms probably signal infection and not just allergies acting up. (Wait 30 minutes after eating or drinking to get an accurate measurement.) sestovic/Getty Images hide caption

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sestovic/Getty Images

This negative-stained transmission electron micrograph depicts the ultrastructural details of an influenza virus particle, or virion. Frederick Murphy/CDC hide caption

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Frederick Murphy/CDC

Flu Season Looms And Scientists Wonder How Flu And COVID-19 Might Mix

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Vaccine-makers are readying 190 million doses of the flu vaccine for deployment across the U.S. this fall — 20 million more doses than in a typical year. A nasal spray version will be available, as well as shots. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Early symptoms of COVID-19 are much the same as those of the flu or a cold. Don't panic. Call your doctor to check in, if you're worried, but treating mild or moderate symptoms at home until you're well will protect you and help stop the spread of whatever you have. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

You Have A Fever And A Dry Cough. Now What?

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Pharmacist Raphael Lynne gives a flu shot in Miami in 2018. This year's vaccination against influenza has been reducing infections by "about 40 to 50 percent," says Emily Martin, an epidemiologist with the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

U.S. Flu Season Beginning To Ease, Modelers Say

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Most efforts to develop a universal flu vaccine have focused on the lollipop-shaped hemagglutinin protein (pink in this illustration of a flu virus). Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A spoonful of honey makes the medicine...irrelevant. That's because honey works better than cough syrups to help with kids' coughs. But don't give honey to infants under one years old. Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm

For Kid's Coughs, Swap The Over-The-Counter Syrups For Honey

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Making sure to frequently give your hands a thorough scrub — with soap and for about as long as it takes to sing the "Happy Birthday" song a couple of times — can significantly cut your chances of catching the flu or other respiratory virus. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Worried About Catching The New Coronavirus? In The U.S., Flu Is A Bigger Threat

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It's still pretty early in the flu season, but some states, including Texas and North Carolina, are already reporting the first influenza deaths, including at least 10 children. Most kids each year who die from the flu had not been vaccinated. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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SDI Productions/Getty Images

Being overweight or obese can diminish the effectiveness of a flu shot, researchers say. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Excess Weight Can Weaken The Flu Shot

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