influenza influenza

Cost, procrastination and a lack of insurance coverage are just a few of the reasons adults give health care providers for not getting vaccinated against shingles and other illnesses. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF

A nurse prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta last month. The disease is still "widespread" in many places, but slowing. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

For The Second Week, The Flu Epidemic Has Eased

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Influenza covers its shell with two types of accessories: the H spike, blue, and the N spike, red. Here the flu particle is sliced open to show its genetic material. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Undergraduate Shira Rubin gamely demonstrates the Gesundheit machine, which collects samples of virus from the breath that sick students exhale. Rubin helps Dr. Somayeh Youssefi (left) set up the machine before patients use it. Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU

When The Flu Hits Campus, The Gesundheit Machine Will Be Ready

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A doctor and nurse confer inside a room used for flu patients at Northside Hospital in Cumming, Ga. The U.S. government's latest flu report, released Friday, showed flu season continued to intensify, with high volumes of flu-related patient traffic in 42 states, up from 39 the week before. Robert Ray/AP hide caption

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Robert Ray/AP

A review of the evidence suggests that alerting people — by text, phone call or other method — when they're due or overdue to get a particular vaccination can boost immunization rates. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A Reminder

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The body's under a lot of stress during a bout of flu, doctors say. Inflammation is up and oxygen levels and blood pressure can drop. These changes can lead to an increased risk of forming blood clots in the vessels that serve the heart. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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laflor/Getty Images

Flu Virus Can Trigger A Heart Attack

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Flu patient Donnie Cardenas waits in an emergency room hallway with roommate Torrey Jewett at the Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, Calif., this past week. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Flu Season Is Shaping Up To Be A Nasty One, CDC Says

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As flu cases mount in California, the state's health department recommends vaccination for all people 6 months and older. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Health workers killed chickens in a Hong Kong market in 2014 in an effort to stop the spread of H7N9 flu. It's being watched closely as a virus that might spark a pandemic outbreak. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

NIH Lifts Ban On Research That Could Make Deadly Viruses Even Worse

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Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year

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The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the flu vaccine an "essential" part of prenatal care, for protection of the newborn as well as the woman. Infants typically don't get their own flu shot until age 6 months or later. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

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A patient with the H7N9 avian flu is treated in a hospital in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei province, in February of this year. The 2017 outbreak was the deadliest in China since H7N9 first appeared in humans in 2013. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

A sometimes lethal strain of H7N9 bird flu that has infected about 1,500 people in China doesn't spread easily among humans — yet. But research published Thursday suggests just a few genetic mutations might be enough to make it quite contagious. Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Pasieka/Science Source

A Few Genetic Tweaks To Chinese Bird Flu Virus Could Fuel A Human Pandemic

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