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This colorized scanning electron micrograph shows human cells in a lab infected with "pink" influenza viruses. As many as 650,000 people each year die from flu, according to the World Health Organization. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

Matt Gleason fainted at work after getting a flu shot, so colleagues called 911 and an ambulance took him to the ER. Eight hours later, Gleason went home with a clean bill of health. Later still he got a hefty bill that wiped out his deductible. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

A Fainting Spell After A Flu Shot Leads To $4,692 ER Visit

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Is It A Nasty Cold Or The Flu?

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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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Lipitor, a best-seller as a cholesterol treatment, is being tested as a remedy for the flu. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

Scientists Find New Tricks For Old Drugs

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Patients are treated at an Army ward in Kansas during the influenza epidemic of 1918. About 675,000 Americans died of the flu known as "la grippe." NYPL/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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NYPL/Science Source/Getty Images

Cost, procrastination and a lack of insurance coverage are just a few of the reasons adults give health care providers for not getting vaccinated against shingles and other illnesses. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF

A nurse prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta last month. The disease is still "widespread" in many places, but slowing. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

For The Second Week, The Flu Epidemic Has Eased

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Influenza covers its shell with two types of accessories: the H spike, blue, and the N spike, red. Here the flu particle is sliced open to show its genetic material. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Undergraduate Shira Rubin gamely demonstrates the Gesundheit machine, which collects samples of virus from the breath that sick students exhale. Rubin helps Dr. Somayeh Youssefi (left) set up the machine before patients use it. Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU

When The Flu Hits Campus, The Gesundheit Machine Will Be Ready

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A doctor and nurse confer inside a room used for flu patients at Northside Hospital in Cumming, Ga. The U.S. government's latest flu report, released Friday, showed flu season continued to intensify, with high volumes of flu-related patient traffic in 42 states, up from 39 the week before. Robert Ray/AP hide caption

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Robert Ray/AP

A review of the evidence suggests that alerting people — by text, phone call or other method — when they're due or overdue to get a particular vaccination can boost immunization rates. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A Reminder

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