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in vitro fertilization

Light micrograph of human egg cells and sperm in a petri dish during in vitro fertilization. ZEPHYR/Science Source hide caption

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ZEPHYR/Science Source

IVF Has Come A Long Way, But Many Don't Have Access

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When Heather Woock was conceived, her mom sought the help of a fertility specialist. What happened next was not what she was led to believe. But it took three decades for it to come to light. Leah Klafczynski for NPR hide caption

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Leah Klafczynski for NPR

Her Own Birth Was 'Fertility Fraud' And Now She Needs Fertility Treatment

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A light micrograph of a primitive human embryo, composed of four cells, following the initial mitotic divisions that ultimately transform a single-cell organism into one composed of millions of cells. Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

Embryo Research To Reduce Need For In Vitro Fertilization Raises Ethical Concerns

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Cleveland Clinic surgeons in February transplanted a uterus from a deceased donor into 26-year-old Lindsey McFarland, who was born without one. Though the experimental surgery was initially thought successful, a raging infection forced removal of the organ within weeks. Cleveland Clinic hide caption

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Cleveland Clinic

A Transplanted Uterus Offers Hope, But Procedure Stirs Debate

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Frozen sperm straws and embryos are stored in liquid nitrogen, in a process known as cryopreservation. One question confronting the courts: Should embryos such as these be treated as property, or as children subject to custody action? Veronique Burger/Science Source hide caption

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Veronique Burger/Science Source

After A Divorce, What Happens To A Couple's Frozen Embryos?

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Stefano Gabbana (left) and Domenico Dolce, seen here during the recent Milan Fashion Week, are being criticized for remarks about same-sex families, sparking a boycott led by musician Elton John. Daniel Dal Zennaro/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Daniel Dal Zennaro/EPA/Landov

The U.K. could become the first country to legalize the production of a human embryo from three donors. Here, the freezing platform for an embryo, top, also known as a straw, is seen at an in vitro fertilization lab. Jim Stevens/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Jim Stevens/MCT/Landov

Tina Nevill of Essex, England, holds Poppy, who was conceived by in vitro fertilization. The U.K.'s health system records all IVF cycles performed in the country. Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Landov
Alvaro Heinzen/iStockphoto

Study Suggests Way To Create New Eggs In Women

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