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Bob Scott, a weed scientist at the University of Arkansas, says he wishes more testing could have been done on the new dicamba formulations, but "the product was not made available to us." Dan Charles/ NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/ NPR

Monsanto Attacks Scientists After Studies Show Trouble For Weedkiller Dicamba

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Brent Henderson harvests soybeans on his farm near Weona, Ark. "If it's going to be legal to use and neighbors are planting it, I'm going to have to plant [dicamba-tolerant soybeans] to protect myself," he says. "It's very annoying. ... My neighbor should not dictate what I do on my farm." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Soybean leaves showing evidence of damage from dicamba. Thousands of acres of soybean fields have shown this kind of damage this spring. Courtesy of the University of Arkansas hide caption

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Courtesy of the University of Arkansas

Last May, members of the Avaaz civic organization dressed as crop-sprayers in Brussels to protest the European Commission's plans to re-license glyphosate, the popular weed-killer sold by Monsanto under the brand name Roundup. John Thys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Thys/AFP/Getty Images

Kansas Farmer Mark Nelson says he's too busy with harvest to think much about abstracts, but he admits that the prospect of depending on fewer and fewer, larger and larger companies for his seed, fertilizer and chemicals is "a little nerve wracking." Frank Morris hide caption

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Frank Morris

Farmers, Antitrust Activists Are Worried That Big Ag Is Only Getting Bigger

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A central Illinois corn farmer refills his sprayer with the weedkiller glyphosate on a farm near Auburn, Ill. The pesticide has been the subject of intense international scrutiny. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Central Illinois corn and soybean farmer Tim Seifert loads his field planter with Syngenta insecticide while planting seed corn in 2011. Monsanto has made a bid to buy Syngenta for its pesticide business. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Central Illinois corn farmer Jerry McCulley refills his sprayer with the weedkiller glyphosate on a farm near Auburn, Ill. A new assessment of the chemical finds that the (uncertain) risks mainly affect the people who work with it or who come in direct contact with areas where it's applied. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

A global positioning receiver on the top of a combine harvester at a farm in Warwick, Md., in June. The equipment uses sensors and computers to help drive the combine along the route where the crops were planted, judge the composition of a crop and generate crop yield reports. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Wheat grows in a test field at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Some scientists believe that there's a chance that genetically modified wheat found in one farmer's field in May is still in the seed supply. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In Oregon, The GMO Wheat Mystery Deepens

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Crop consultant Dan Steiner inspects a field of corn near Norfolk, Neb. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

As Biotech Seed Falters, Insecticide Use Surges In Corn Belt

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Vernon Hugh Bowman, who took his case to the Supreme Court, lives outside the small town of Sandborn, Ind. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Vernon Hugh Bowman lives outside the small town of Sandborn, Ind. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Farmer's Fight With Monsanto Reaches The Supreme Court

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