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Wyoming attorney Karen Budd-Falen, recently named as Deputy Solicitor for Parks and Wildlife at the Department of the Interior, sits in her law office in Cheyenne, Wyo. Mead Gruver/AP hide caption

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Mead Gruver/AP

Some of the cattle grazing on the Persson Ranch are tracked using blockchain technology, which may allow consumers to know where their meat comes from and more. Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio

Where's The Beef? Wyoming Ranchers Bet On Blockchain To Track It

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At least three marijuana plants have been discovered in city-owned planters in Powell, Wyo. Courtesy of the City of Powell Parks and Recreation Department hide caption

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Courtesy of the City of Powell Parks and Recreation Department

The Diamond B Ranch, north of Cheyenne, Wyo., is no longer a working property. It's been bought and subdivided by a realty company. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio

Rural Lands At Risk As Ranchers Prepare For Retirement

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One 8.5-oz. serving of THC-laced beverage (left) alongside three ounces of dried marijuana (right). Miles Bryan/Wyoming Public Media hide caption

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Miles Bryan/Wyoming Public Media

How Much Pot Is In That Brownie? Wyoming Moves To Toughen Edible Marijuana Laws

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Brandon Hoover, the one human resident of Buford, gets ready to feed Sugar, the unofficial town mascot. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Buford: Come for the Coffee, Stay ... To Keep The Tiny Town Open

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Buzz Hettick scans federal Bureau of Land Management land near his home in Laramie, Wyo., scouting for an upcoming hunt. He worries the proposed transfer of federal lands to the states would jeopardize the public's access to these lands. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Push To Transfer Federal Lands To States Has Sportsmen On Edge

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President-elect Donald Trump's promises to bring back miner jobs and open mines appealed to many voters in coal country. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

A car drives by a Switch data center in Las Vegas on Sept. 9, 2015. In 2013, data centers consumed 2 percent of all U.S. power — triple what they used in 2000. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

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See Where Women Have The Most And Least Political Representation In The U.S.

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Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks during a political rally on April 5 in Laramie, Wyo. Sanders spoke to a large crowd on the University of Wyoming campus after winning the Wisconsin primary. Theo Stroomer/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Stroomer/Getty Images

Reclaimed land that was once mined for coal in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. When coal companies declare bankruptcy, funding for land reclamation becomes a question Leigh Paterson/Inside Energy hide caption

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Leigh Paterson/Inside Energy

When Coal Companies Fail, Who Pays For The Cleanup?

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