Emergency Room Emergency Room

Emergencies happen at all hours, but the cost of staffing an emergency department at night is higher than by day, according to emergency care providers. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

Some personal injury law firms now automatically target online ads at anyone who enters a nearby hospital's emergency room and has a cellphone. The ads may show up on multiple devices for more than a month. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

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Digital Ambulance Chasers? Law Firms Send Ads To Patients' Phones Inside ERs

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The health insurance company Anthem has introduced a policy discouraging patients from "avoidable" emergency room visits. Patients and doctors are pushing back against the program. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Cheryl Chandler says she happened to click on a viral video showing a woman wearing a hospital gown, not knowing it showed her 22-year-old daughter, Rebecca. She has mental health issues and was left outside a Baltimore hospital on a cold January night. The video recorded by a passer-by went viral. Jared Soares for NPR hide caption

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Jared Soares for NPR

'Failing Patients': Baltimore Video Highlights Crisis Of Emergency Psychiatric Care

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Ogechi Ukachu, one of the registered nurses recently hired to help staff D.C.'s "Right Care Right Now" program, takes a training call at the city's 911 call center. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Can Triage Nurses Help Prevent 911 Overload?

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Free-standing ERs tend to have lower standby costs than hospital-based facilities that have to be ready to treat dire injuries. But the free-standing ERs typically receive the same Medicare rate for emergency services. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

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sshepard/Getty Images

As a "hospital-at-home" patient, Phyllis Petruzzelli was visited twice a day by doctors and nurses who were able to perform any needed tests or bloodwork there to help her heal from pneumonia. "I'd do it again in a heartbeat," Petruzzelli says. Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Emergency rooms are seeing a jump in opioid overdoses. Timely treatment with naloxone can reverse the effects of opioids. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Jump In Overdoses Shows Opioid Epidemic Has Worsened

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Ashley Copeland (right) talks to her mom Sue Iverson in the Swedish Medical Center emergency department, near Denver. Copeland got a nerve-blocking anesthetic instead of opioids to ease her severe headache. At discharge she was advised to use over-the-counter painkillers, if necessary. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

These 10 ERs Sharply Reduced Opioid Use And Still Eased Pain

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Francisco Hidalgo prepares to receive a trigger point injection from Dr. Alexis LaPietra (right) at St. Joseph's University Medical Center in Paterson, N.J., while Dr. Tyler Manis observes. An alternative to opioids, the trigger point injection involves dry needling to stop pain from a muscle spasm and a shot of local anesthetic for the soreness from the needle. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

ER Reduces Opioid Use By More Than Half With Dry Needles, Laughing Gas

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Women are catching up with men nationally in overall drinking, as well as in binge drinking, drunk driving and deaths from cirrhosis of the liver caused by alcoholism. Vasyl Tretiakov / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Vasyl Tretiakov / EyeEm/Getty Images

Carmen Algeria, a survivor of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, was admitted to Sunrise Hospital. She had been shot in the leg and on Oct. 2 was awaiting surgery. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images

Dr. Winston Watkins, an internist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Houston, volunteered to do a shift in the ER to give his colleagues a break. Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA hide caption

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Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA

In A Houston Emergency Room, It Was A Week Like No Other

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As baby boomers age, more older Americans are visiting the emergency room, which can be an overcrowded, disorienting and even traumatic place. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore opened a six-bed urgent care center next to its infusion center a couple of years ago. Of the patients who land there, about 80 percent are discharged home afterward, rather than needing admission to the hospital. Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine

Although expanding Medicaid in Oregon didn't drive down the recipients' overall use of hospital emergency rooms, the state has seen a decline in avoidable use of ERs by 4 percent in the past two years, according to state statistics. Paul Burns/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Burns/Getty Images

Emergency Room Use Stays High In Oregon Medicaid Study

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Too often, pediatricians say, the teen depression that went undiagnosed in the community shows up in the ER as a suicide attempt. Studio 642/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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