ebola ebola

Supporters of the Congress for Democratic Change party take part in a meeting in Monorovia on Nov. 20 for the opening of political campaign activities for senatorial elections. Elections are due to take place on Dec. 16, after being suspended because of the Ebola epidemic. Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images

Campaign Rallies Resume In Liberia, Raising Uncertainty Over Ebola Risk

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Since it was built by the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service in 1998, 90,000 emergency responders have come to "Disaster City" to climb over mangled steel and through derailed chemical trains. Lauren Silverman /KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman /KERA

In 'Disaster City,' Learning To Use Robots To Face Ebola

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Among the dilemmas that arise when health workers are in their protective garb: What if you can't find the person assigned to be your Ebola Treatment Unit partner? John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

On Lumley Beach, after day trippers have headed home, prostitutes look for customers along a 100-yard stretch of road near some of the nicer hotels as well as near the bars and restaurants along the beachfront. Simon Akam/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Simon Akam/Reuters/Landov

A helicopter's eye view of a new ETU, funded by USAID and built by Save the Children. Kelly McEvers/NPR hide caption

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Kelly McEvers/NPR

Ebola Is Changing Course In Liberia. Will The U.S. Military Adapt?

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A hand-drawn map on the wall of a rural clinic shows health workers where a woman with Ebola may be hiding. Kelly McEvers/NPR hide caption

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Kelly McEvers/NPR

As Ebola Pingpongs In Liberia, Cases Disappear Into The Jungle

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Wencke Petersen, a Doctors Without Borders health worker, talks to a man through a chain link gate in September, when she was doing patient assessment at the front gate of an Ebola treatment unit. "There were days we couldn't take any patients at all," she tells NPR. Michel du Cille/The Washington Post hide caption

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Michel du Cille/The Washington Post

Ebola Gatekeeper: 'When The Tears Stop, You Continue The Work'

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Surveillance team member Osman Sow washes his boots after working in a potentially contaminated area of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Survey teams are sent out every day to assess sick people and dispatch burial teams to collect the dead. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Ebola Survey Teams Take A Grim Census In Sierra Leone

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Dr. Komba Songu M'Briwah, left, talks on the phone while staff members disinfect offices at the Hastings Ebola Treatment Center in Freetown. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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An Ebola Clinic Figures Out A Way To Start Beating The Odds

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Baby Sesay, a traditional healer in Sierra Leone, treated a child who later died, apparently of Ebola, and then became sick herself and went to a care center. As this photo was taken, her body seized up and she nearly collapsed. David P Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David P Gilkey/NPR

India has record no Ebola cases, but the country is on high alert and has quarantined hundreds of travelers from West Africa. This hospital in New Delhi has set up an Intensive Care Unit for potential Ebola patients. Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images