ebola ebola

Each year thousands of people from around the world tour the Gomantong Cave in Borneo. Although scientists have found a potentially dangerous virus in bats that roost in the cave, no one has ever gotten sick from a trip here. Razis Nasri hide caption

toggle caption
Razis Nasri

The Next Pandemic Could Be Dripping On Your Head

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/508060742/516375503" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman is vaccinated at a health center in Conakry, Guinea, during the clinical trials of a vaccine against the Ebola virus. Cellou Binani /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cellou Binani /AFP/Getty Images

First Ebola Vaccine Likely To Stop The Next Outbreak

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506600875/506731725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Ebola burial team dons protective clothing before collecting the body of a woman who'd died from the virus in her home in a suburb of Monrovia, Liberia's capital. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

A Gang Killed A Guy With Ebola. Will They Agree To Be Quarantined?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505658504/505658505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
John Moore/Getty Images

A Stabbing, A Possible Ebola Outbreak, And A 'Time Bomb'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504462924/504466912" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Emmie de Wit, who usually works in a Biosafety Level 4 Lab, spent time in less secure labs in Liberia during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Above, she prepares to test Ebola patient blood samples. Courtesy of NIAID hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of NIAID

Omu Fahnbulleh stands over her husband after he staggered and fell, knocking him unconscious at an Ebola ward in Liberia in 2014. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Mutant Ebola May Have Caused Explosive Outbreak

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/500428232/500560238" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mystery disease in South Sudan has not been identified but is known to cause fever and unexplained bleeding. Above: an image of another hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, made with an electron microscope and then colorized. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Margaret Chan (left), director general of the World Health Organization, is among the dignitaries visiting a military base in Conakry, Guinea, on a tour of west African countries affected by Ebola. Also pictured: Guinean President Alpha Conde (fourth from right) and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon (right). BINANI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BINANI/AFP/Getty Images

WHO Aims To Reform Itself But Health Experts Aren't Yet Impressed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479228380/479349681" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Scientists Say It's Time To End 'Parachute Research'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472686809/473711371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript