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biodiversity

A Seychelles magpie-robin at the protected Cousin Island Special Reserve in Seychelles. James Warwick/Getty Images hide caption

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James Warwick/Getty Images

Opinion: 1 Million Species Are At Risk Of Disappearing. Humans Should Act Now

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"Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history," a U.N. panel says, reporting that around 1 million species are currently at risk. Here, an endangered hawksbill turtle swims in a Singapore aquarium in 2017. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

1 Million Animal And Plant Species Are At Risk Of Extinction, U.N. Report Says

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While many Americans only know one kind of pomegranate — the ruby red Wonderful — there are actually dozens of varieties with different flavor and heartiness profiles. Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside hide caption

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Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside

A Przewalski mare with her foal at the Highland Wildlife Park in Kingussie, Scotland, in 2013. It turns out that Przewalski's horses are actually feral descendants of the first horses that humans are known to have domesticated, around 5,500 years ago. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

Why The Last 'Wild' Horses Really Aren't

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Plankton collected in the Pacific Ocean with a 0.1mm mesh net. Seen here is a mix of multicellular organisms — small zooplanktonic animals, larvae and single protists (diatoms, dinoflagellates, radiolarians) — the nearly invisible universe at the bottom of the marine food chain. Christian Sardet/CNRS/Tara Expeditions hide caption

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Christian Sardet/CNRS/Tara Expeditions

Revealed: The Ocean's Tiniest Life At The Bottom Of The Food Chain

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Brazilian fruits, including jambu and tapereba (lower right), displayed for a gathering of chefs in Sao Paolo. Paula Moura for NPR hide caption

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Paula Moura for NPR

Ferran Adria And Fellow Star Chefs Talk Biodiversity In Brazil

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The Bronx may be up and the Battery down, but Central Park is where an amazing wealth of different sorts of microbes play. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Soil Doctors Hit Pay Dirt In Manhattan's Central Park

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Samples of forage seeds in the International Center for Tropical Agriculture gene bank recently sent to the Global Seed Vault in Svalbard, Norway. International Center for Tropical Agriculture hide caption

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International Center for Tropical Agriculture

The Ultimate In Heirloom Wheat Arrives At Seed Vault

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