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Alex Azar, secretary of Health and Human Services, announced a new rule requiring drugmakers to publish drug list prices in TV ads. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Oakley Yoder walks with her parents, Josh Perry and Shelli Yoder, outside their home in Bloomington, Ind. Chris Bergin for KHN hide caption

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Chris Bergin for KHN

Summer Bummer: A Young Camper's $142,938 Snakebite

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The uncompensated care costs among Colorado hospitals dropped by more than 60 percent after the state expanded Medicaid coverage — a savings of more than $400 million statewide. But a new report asks why the hospitals didn't pass some of those savings on to patients. Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images hide caption

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Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images

Carol Marley, a hospital nurse with private insurance, says coping with the financial fallout of her pancreatic cancer has been exhausting. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Cancer Complications: Confusing Bills, Maddening Errors And Endless Phone Calls

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Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., left, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, asked drug company CEOs some tough questions about drug prices on Tuesday during a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody. Since Brody was born, the Canos have racked up nearly $12,000 in medical debt. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Sarah Witter fractured two bones in her lower left leg while skiing in Vermont last February. She had two operations to repair the damage. The second surgery was needed to replace a metal plate that broke after it was implanted. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Bill Of The Month: $43,208 For Repeat Surgery To Replace Broken Medical Device

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A CPAP machine can treat obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder which causes people to temporarily stop breathing throughout the night. But the machines, which blow air into a person's airways, take some getting used to. Brandon Thibodeaux/ProPublica hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux/ProPublica

Janet Winston stands in her rose garden in Eureka, Calif. Testing revealed she is allergic to numerous substances, including linalool. Winston still can handle roses, which contain linalool, but she can't wear perfumes and cosmetic products that contain the compound. Alexandra Hootnick hide caption

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Alexandra Hootnick

Bill Of The Month: A $48,329 Allergy Test Is A Lot Of Scratch

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Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

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"The biggest challenge for me was to see how I would be a father again," says Dr. Naveed Khan, who was injured while driving an all-terrain vehicle. "With two able-bodied parents at home, it was easier." Shelby Knowles for NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for NPR

Taken For A Ride: M.D. Injured In ATV Crash Gets $56,603 Bill For Air Ambulance Trip

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Because of a recent court decision, the size of the financial incentive your employer offers you in hopes of motivating you to lower your cholesterol or lose weight may soon shrink. Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images hide caption

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Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images

Massachusetts wanted to negotiate prices and stop the use of some of the most expensive drugs in its Medicaid program. The federal government said no. Paul Marotta/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Marotta/Getty Images

A survey finds many Americans get unexpected medical bills and the majority come because patients expect their insurance to cover more than it actually does. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Getty Images

In his new job overseeing health coverage for 1.2 million workers and their families, Atul Gawande says he hopes to find specific ways to make health care more efficient and the solutions exportable. Dan Bayer /The Aspen Institute via Flickr hide caption

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Dan Bayer /The Aspen Institute via Flickr

Dr. Atul Gawande has been picked to lead the high-profile joint venture in health care formed by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JP Morgan Chase. Mint/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Mint/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

"As bad as NYU is, Aetna is equally culpable because Aetna's job was to be the checks and balances and to be my advocate," said Michael Frank, seen at his home in Port Chester, N.Y. Annie Tritt for ProPublica hide caption

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Annie Tritt for ProPublica

The health insurance company Anthem has introduced a policy discouraging patients from "avoidable" emergency room visits. Patients and doctors are pushing back against the program. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

An X-ray of Sherry Young's foot shows the four implanted screws — each of which cost more than a high-end computer. Courtesy of Sherry Young hide caption

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Courtesy of Sherry Young