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An employee at a Methodist University Hospital is being sued by her employer for unpaid medical bills incurred before they hired her. Andrea Morales for MLK50 hide caption

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Andrea Morales for MLK50

A Tennessee Hospital Sues Its Own Employees When They Can't Pay Their Medical Bills

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Dr. Rebekah Gee, secretary of the Louisiana Department of Health, negotiated a deal with a drugmaker to get the state a better price for expensive hepatitis C medications for its Medicaid and prison populations. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Daisha Smith says she only realized she had been sued over her hospital bill when she saw her paycheck was being garnished. "I literally have no food in my house because they're garnishing my check," she says. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Falcigno/NPR

When Hospitals Sue For Unpaid Bills, It Can Be 'Ruinous' For Patients

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An executive order President Trump signed Monday aims to make most hospital pricing more transparent to patients, long before they get the bill. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

The executive order on drug price transparency that President Trump signed Monday doesn't spell out specific actions; rather, it directs the department of Health and Human Services to develop a policy and then undertake a lengthy rule-making process. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Administration Pushes To Make Health Care Pricing More Transparent

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In many rural areas, helicopters are the only speedy way to get patients to a trauma center or hospital burn unit. As more than 100 rural hospitals have closed around the U.S. since 2010, the need for air transport has only increased. Ollo/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollo/Getty Images

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member, and Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate health committee, introduced legislation to address health care issues such as surprise medical bills and high drug costs. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., is co-sponsoring legislation with Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., to curtail surprise medical bills. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Errors in reading diagnostic images like MRIs or CT scans can lead to unnecessary and costly medical procedures. Walmart is pushing its employees to use a vetted list of high-quality imaging centers to avoid errors. HadelProductions/Getty Images hide caption

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HadelProductions/Getty Images

Alex Azar, secretary of Health and Human Services, announced a new rule requiring drugmakers to publish drug list prices in TV ads. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Oakley Yoder walks with her parents, Josh Perry and Shelli Yoder, outside their home in Bloomington, Ind. Chris Bergin for KHN hide caption

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Chris Bergin for KHN

Summer Bummer: A Young Camper's $142,938 Snakebite

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The uncompensated care costs among Colorado hospitals dropped by more than 60 percent after the state expanded Medicaid coverage — a savings of more than $400 million statewide. But a new report asks why the hospitals didn't pass some of those savings on to patients. Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images hide caption

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Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images

Carol Marley, a hospital nurse with private insurance, says coping with the financial fallout of her pancreatic cancer has been exhausting. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Cancer Complications: Confusing Bills, Maddening Errors And Endless Phone Calls

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Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., left, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, asked drug company CEOs some tough questions about drug prices on Tuesday during a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody. Since Brody was born, the Canos have racked up nearly $12,000 in medical debt. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Sarah Witter fractured two bones in her lower left leg while skiing in Vermont last February. She had two operations to repair the damage. The second surgery was needed to replace a metal plate that broke after it was implanted. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Bill Of The Month: $43,208 For Repeat Surgery To Replace Broken Medical Device

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A CPAP machine can treat obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder which causes people to temporarily stop breathing throughout the night. But the machines, which blow air into a person's airways, take some getting used to. Brandon Thibodeaux/ProPublica hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux/ProPublica

Janet Winston stands in her rose garden in Eureka, Calif. Testing revealed she is allergic to numerous substances, including linalool. Winston still can handle roses, which contain linalool, but she can't wear perfumes and cosmetic products that contain the compound. Alexandra Hootnick hide caption

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Alexandra Hootnick

Bill Of The Month: A $48,329 Allergy Test Is A Lot Of Scratch

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Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

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