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The wooden door panel that saves Rose's life in the 1997 blockbuster Titanic was one of hundreds of iconic Hollywood props, and several from the movie, auctioned off in a five-day sale last week. Heritage Auctions hide caption

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Heritage Auctions

James Cameron walks in Purmamarca, Argentina, earlier this month. He's compared the OceanGate submersible tragedy to that of the Titanic itself. Javier Corbalan/AP hide caption

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Javier Corbalan/AP

In this screenshot captured by NPR, the bow of the shipwrecked Titanic is seen from the first human-operated vehicle to visit the site in 1986. The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution released footage from that 1986 dive on Wednesday. Screenshot by NPR/WHOI hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/WHOI

Spider and Director James Cameron behind the senses of the 20th century studio's Avatar: The Way of Water. Mark Fellman hide caption

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Mark Fellman

James Cameron wants everyone to see 'Avatar 2' in theaters

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Fans have long debated whether there was room for both Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and Rose (Kate Winslet) on the makeshift raft in the 1997 blockbuster Titanic. CBS Photo Archive via Getty Images hide caption

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CBS Photo Archive via Getty Images
Catherine Ivill/Getty Images

Big entertainment bets: World Cup & Avatar

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Suzy Amis Cameron, wife of director James Cameron, and gardener and educator Paul Hudak inspect seedlings in the MUSE School CA greenhouse in Calabasas, Calif. Amis Cameron, who founded the school with her sister, wants the school menu to be entirely plant-based by fall 2015. Eliza Barclay/NPR hide caption

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Eliza Barclay/NPR