end of life care end of life care

Maxine Stanich celebrated her 90th birthday with friends and family in 2010, more than two years after her implanted defibrillator was deactivated by Dr. Rita Redberg to comply with Stanich's "do not resuscitate" directive. Courtesy of Susan Giaquinto/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtesy of Susan Giaquinto/Kaiser Health News

Doctors in Miami found that a man's tattoo expressing his end-of-life wishes was more confusing than helpful. Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally

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Earl Borges, now 70, conducted river patrols in the Navy during the Vietnam War. These days, he says, symptoms from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ALS can intensify the anxiety he experiences as a result of PTSD. Courtesy of Shirley Borges hide caption

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Courtesy of Shirley Borges

Reverberations Of War Complicate Vietnam Veterans' End-Of-Life Care

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Helping her father die at home "was the most meaningful experience in my nursing career," said Rose Crumb. She went on to found Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County in Port Angeles, Wash. Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News

The Rev. Noel Hickie was working as a hospital chaplain when he met Marcia Hilton, a bereavement counselor at a hospital in Eugene, Ore. For 25 years they often worked together on hospice teams. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

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Courtesy of StoryCorps

For Decades These Caregivers Helped Patients, Families Through Illness And Death

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John Minor (center) in December 2014, surrounded by his family — Jackie Minor (left), Soren Johnson, John Minor, Sherry Minor, Skyelyn Johnson and Valerie Minor Johnson — in Manhattan Beach, Calif. Kimberly Sienkiewicz/Courtesy of the Minor family hide caption

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Kimberly Sienkiewicz/Courtesy of the Minor family

Aid-In-Dying Requires More Than Just A Law, Californians Find

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Dad called these "his and hers chairs." He would sit beside Mom, his partner and wife of 34 years, as they got their weekly chemotherapy treatments. Howie Borowick had just been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and wife Laurel was in treatment for breast cancer for the third time. For him, it was new and unknown. For her, it was business as usual, another appointment on her calendar. Nancy Borowick hide caption

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Nancy Borowick

Our Last Year Together: What My Camera Captured As My Parents Died Of Cancer

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As baby boomers age, more older Americans are visiting the emergency room, which can be an overcrowded, disorienting and even traumatic place. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News
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Doctor Considers The Pitfalls Of Extending Life And Prolonging Death

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Annette Schiller of Palm Desert, Calif., who was 94 and diagnosed with terminal thyroid and breast cancer, had trouble finding doctors to help her end her life under California's new aid-in-dying law. Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald hide caption

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Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald

Adox and Michaeli with their son, Orion, in the winter of 2015. Courtesy of Christine Gatti hide caption

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Courtesy of Christine Gatti

A Dying Man's Wish To Donate His Organs Gets Complicated

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The Rev. Josephine Falls handed out stickers to voters while accepting ballots inside the Denver Elections Division offices on Tuesday. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piscotty/Getty Images