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FILE - A protestor holds a sign during a Students Demand Action event, near the U.S. Capitol, Monday, June 6, 2022, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Poll: Most Americans say curbing gun violence is more important than gun rights

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An individual right to own a gun for personal protection is an idea deeply rooted in American culture. But for most of U.S. history, there was little legal framework to support any such interpretation of the Second Amendment. Above, a man aims his pistol at a shooting range in Queens, in New York, in June. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal to expand gun rights in the United States in a New York case over the right to carry a firearm in public for self-defense. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Gun rights supporters, including militia members, rally in support of gun rights in September 2018 during an event put on by the Idaho Second Amendment Alliance. The alliance and groups like it around the country have been pushing back against efforts to increase gun regulations in the wake of high rates of gun violence. Heath Druzin/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

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Heath Druzin/Boise State Public Radio

Demonstrators stand outside a security zone in Richmond, Va., on Monday. Thousands of activists and gun enthusiasts converged on the city to urge the state not to pass new gun laws. Tyrone Turner/WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/WAMU

Richmond Gun Rally: Thousands Of Gun Owners Converge On Virginia Capitol On MLK Day

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Gov. Ralph Northam said state intelligence analysts have identified threats and rhetoric online that mirror the chatter they were picking up around the time of the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville in 2017. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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New York police Sgt. Damon Martin in the 75th Precinct field intelligence office, where the walls are covered with photos of seized illegal guns. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Does New York City Need Gun Control?

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Antonio Basco, husband of El Paso Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, hugs an attendee during his wife's visitation service in El Paso, Texas, in August. Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Poll: Most Americans Want To See Congress Pass Gun Restrictions

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Oliver North speaks at the National Rifle Association Institute for Legislative Action Leadership Forum at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis on Friday. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

As NRA Leadership Fight Spills Into Public, N.Y. Attorney General Opens Investigation

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Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., speaks to a group in Iowa City, Iowa, in February. Swalwell, who became the latest Democrat to run for president, was born in Iowa but grew up in California. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Blake Mycoskie attends the TOMS' End Gun Violence Together Rally, Feb. 11, 2019 in Washington, D.C. Mycoskie, the founder of TOMS shoes, is one of four business leaders asking Congress to pass a bill requiring background checks on all gun sales. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for TOMS Shoes hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for TOMS Shoes

CEOs Urge Congress To Expand Gun Background Checks

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The conversation around gun violence in the U.S. usually focuses on homicides, urban crime and mass shootings. But the overwhelming majority of gun deaths are suicides. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Sharp Increase In Gun Suicides Signals Growing Public Health Crisis

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The Supreme Court term that just concluded was a small taste of what is to come. In all, 13 of the cases decided by a liberal-conservative split, Justice Anthony Kennedy provided the fifth and deciding conservative vote. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Demonstrators march toward Las Vegas City Hall during the March for Our Lives rally last month in Las Vegas, where 58 people were killed in an October 2017 mass shooting. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Supreme Court is shown on Dec. 4, 2017, in Washington, D.C. The court, continuing a years-long pattern, has declined to hear a constitutional challenge to a state gun law. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Gun shop owner Jeff Binkley displays a Glock 9mm pistol at Sarge's Sidearms in Benson, Ariz., in September. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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With Trump Win, Gun Sellers See Win — And Loss

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A new ballot measure in Washington will determine if courts can take away guns from people deemed to be dangerous to themselves or others. The initiative is well-funded and comes two years after the state passed a different initiative for background checks on gun sales, including those that are private. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Gun Control Groups Aim Their Money At States — And The Ballot

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