Iditarod Iditarod

Four-time and defending champion Dallas Seavey mushes during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Anchorage, Alaska, on March 4. Seavey has faced recent accusations of doping, which he denies, and animal cruelty, which local officials say is not supported by evidence. Michael Dinneen/AP hide caption

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Michael Dinneen/AP

Dallas Seavey poses with his lead dogs Reef (left) and Tide after finishing the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska, in March 2016. Seavey denies he administered banned drugs to his dogs in this year's race and has withdrawn from the 2018 race in protest. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

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Mark Thiessen/AP

Mitch Seavey poses with his lead dogs Pilot, left, and Crisp under the Burled Arch after winning the 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, in Nome, Alaska, on Tuesday. Seavey won his third Iditarod, becoming the fastest and oldest champion at age 57. Diana Haecker/AP hide caption

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Diana Haecker/AP

The dogs that race in the Iditarod are well-trained and competitive. And, you know, sometimes they're a bit derpy looking. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Magician Juggles His Way Out Of Trouble With The Police

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Aliy Zirkle handles her dogs during a rest in Galena along the Yukon River, her last stop before heading towards Nulato. Late in the night, as she approached Nulato, Zirkle was attacked by a snowmobiler a few miles outside the small community. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Aliy Zirkle drives her dog team during the 2014 Iditarod. Emily Schwing/NPR hide caption

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Emily Schwing/NPR

Iditarod's Top Dogs Will Brave New Twists

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Several female mushers in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race are trying out new attire that allows them to skip bathroom stops. Here, a musher and his team pass fans at the ceremonial start of the race in Anchorage. Dan Joling/AP hide caption

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Dan Joling/AP

Dallas Seavey holds his leaders, Diesel, left, and Guiness, after he arrived at the finish line to claim victory in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska, on Tuesday, March 13, 2012. Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News/Landov hide caption

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Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News/Landov