nursing homes nursing homes
Stories About

nursing homes

Jay McAbee, a bus driver with the Greenville, S.C., school district, waits by his bus in Charleston, S.C., in October of 2016, for word of when to start evacuating the city's residents in advance of Hurricane Matthew. Simply having enough buses to carry pets as well as people can be key to convincing residents they need to leave ahead of a big storm, emergency responders say. Mic Smith/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mic Smith/AP

Safely Evacuating The Elderly In Any Emergency Takes Planning And Practice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/673710296/683021690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medicare's new program will alter a year's worth of payments to 14,959 skilled nursing facilities across the U.S., based on how often in the past fiscal year their residents ended up back in hospitals within 30 days of leaving. BSIP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BSIP/Getty Images

Engineers made a startling discovery while inspecting a fire-damaged public housing complex. They found a 74-year-old tenant, alive and well, five days after the building was supposedly evacuated in the midst of the blaze. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

About a decade ago, the FDA started requiring drugmakers to add black box warnings to labels and prescribing information for Seroquel and other antipsychotic drugs. The agency made the change after the medications were linked to an increased risk of death among elderly dementia patients. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'Dear Doctor' Letters Use Peer Pressure, Government Warning To Stop Overprescribing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636184559/636237846" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Tang Yau Hoong/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Family Caregivers Exchange Tips, Share Stories To Ease Alzheimer's Losses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621110042/626442145" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The CDC is trying to stop E. coli and other bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics because they can cause a deadly infection. Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

toggle caption
Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria Working

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599194350/599240810" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Zoila Gutierrez (left) is a student in the Encuentro home health aide class in Albequerque. Though her youngest daughter is a citizen and two older kids are registered under DACA, Gutierrez doesn't have papers, and knows she may have to leave her job and return to Mexico. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ina Jaffe/NPR

U.S. Immigration Policy Threatens Shake-Up In Home Health Business

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/587691189/591852765" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol and risperidone are FDA-approved for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but can increase the risk of death in older people who have dementia. Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images

Risky Antipsychotic Drugs Still Overprescribed In Nursing Homes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583435517/584114072" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Gloria Single and her husband Bill Single in the dining hall of the skilled nursing floor at Pioneer House nursing home in Sacramento. AARP Foundation attorneys say California needs to more tightly enforce laws that prohibit evictions of the sort that separated the Singles, and sped up her physical decline. Aubrey Jones hide caption

toggle caption
Aubrey Jones

AARP Foundation Sues Nursing Home To Stop Illegal Evictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/563710785/563894885" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Roughly 1.4 million people in the U.S. live in nursing homes, and two-thirds are covered by Medicaid, the state-federal health care program for people with low incomes or disabilities. Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Blend Images/Getty Images

Nursing homes are required to have emergency plans and have staff practice evacuations, but many fail to meet even those basic requirements. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

A recent study shows a link between high discharge rates for live patients and hospice profit margins. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Hospice Patients Discharged While Still Alive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542607941/542753077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript