individual mandate individual mandate

Isabel Diaz Tinoco and Jose Luis Tinoco had some questions for the Miami insurance agent who helped guide them in signing up for a HealthCare.gov policy at the Mall of the Americas in November. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

HealthCare.gov Enrollment Ends Friday. Sign-Ups Likely To Trail Last Year's

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Opposition to Obamacare has been strong from the beginning. Demonstrators made their dissatisfaction clear in front of the Supreme Court in 2015. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Margarita Mills (left), an insurance agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, helped Daniela Morales shop for an Affordable Care Act health plan at the Mall of the Americas in Miami last month. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump at a Senate GOP lunch with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo. (left), and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., on Tuesday, where he talked with several holdouts on the tax bill about measures to bring them on board. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Trump Visits Capitol Hill To Lobby For Tax Vote

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., at a news conference on Tuesday where they announced that the individual mandate to have health insurance would be repealed in the Senate GOP tax bill. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, and Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., listen to debate on tax reform on Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander chairs the Senate's Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee; Sen. Patty Murray is the committee's ranking Democrat. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty

Steve Daines of Montana (right) talks with fellow Republican Sens. Mitch McConnell and Pat Roberts in a White House meeting in June on the GOP health care strategy, which would include deep cuts to Medicaid. Montana insurers say the plan worries them. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Montana Insurers Say Medicaid Cuts Would Drive Up Cost Of Private Health Plans

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Carl Goulden, of Littlestown Pa., developed hepatitis B 10 years ago. Soon his health insurance premiums soared beyond a price he and his wife could afford. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

U.S. Health Care Wrestles With The 'Pre-Existing Condition'

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To keep health insurance solvent, the pool of covered people needs to include the well and the sick. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

One person who got a letter canceling his health insurance was Rep. Cory Gardner, R-Colo. He holds up the letter during a congressional hearing Wednesday on insurance problems. He says his family chose to buy private insurance rather than use the congressional plan. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Notices Canceling Health Insurance Leave Many On Edge

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Supporters and opponents of the health care law rallied in front of the Supreme Court Tuesday, as the court considered the constitutionality of the insurance mandate. John Rose/NPR hide caption

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John Rose/NPR

A bulletin board in New York's Jamaica Hospital offers advice for uninsured patients. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Uninsured Will Still Need The Money To Meet The Mandate

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4 Questions That Could Make Or Break The Health Care Law

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Sally Baptiste from Orlando, Fla., waits outside the U.S. Capitol for the vote on the health care bill on March 21, 2010. Astrid Riecken/Getty Images hide caption

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Astrid Riecken/Getty Images

How The Health Law Could Survive Without A Mandate

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