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heart attacks

"There's a certain notion that e-cigarettes are harmless," says Dr. Paul Ndunda, an assistant professor at the School of Medicine at the University of Kansas in Wichita. "But ... while they're less harmful than normal cigarettes, their use still comes with risks." RyanJLane/Getty Images hide caption

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RyanJLane/Getty Images

Daily low-dose aspirin can be of help to older people with an elevated risk for a heart attack. But for healthy older people, the risk outweighs the benefit. Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images

Study: A Daily Baby Aspirin Has No Benefit For Healthy Older People

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Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

His $109K Heart Attack Bill Is Now Down To $332 After NPR Told His Story

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Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

Life-Threatening Heart Attack Leaves Teacher With $108,951 Bill

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The body's under a lot of stress during a bout of flu, doctors say. Inflammation is up and oxygen levels and blood pressure can drop. These changes can lead to an increased risk of forming blood clots in the vessels that serve the heart. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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laflor/Getty Images

Flu Virus Can Trigger A Heart Attack

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Drones carrying automated external defibrillators got to the sites of previous cardiac arrest cases faster than ambulances had, according to test runs conducted by Swedish researchers. Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse hide caption

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Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse

Doctors have known for a long time that alcohol consumption can cause heart problems. Researchers in Germany used the Oktoberfest beer festival to link binge drinking to abnormal heart rhythms. Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

Exercise physiologist Courtney Conners checks Mario Oikonomides' vital signs before his cardiac rehab workout at the University of Virginia Health System clinic. Francis Ying/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Francis Ying/Kaiser Health News

Cardiac Rehab Saves Lives. So Why Don't More Heart Patients Sign Up?

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Tracy Solomon Clark didn't realize that the shortness of breath and dizziness she felt at age 44 was actually serious heart disease. Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR hide caption

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Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR

Hidden Heart Disease Is The Top Health Threat For U.S. Women

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Lipitor (atorvastain calcium) tablets made by Pfizer. PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

What To Think About Conflicting Medical Guidelines

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Metronome Can Help Set The CPR Beat

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Researchers say poor sleep quality, too much sleep and too little sleep all play a role in heart health. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Good Quality Sleep May Build Healthy Hearts

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Michael Arnott, of Cambridge, Mass., says he used to have trouble staying awake on long drives. Sleep specialists discovered he has obstructive sleep apnea, though not for the most common reasons — he isn't overweight, and doesn't smoke or take sedatives. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

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M. Scott Brauer for NPR

Snooze Alert: A Sleep Disorder May Be Harming Your Body And Brain

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A Stanford University study explored the medical records of millions of people looking for patterns. People taking proton-pump inhibitors for chronic heartburn seemed to be at somewhat higher risk of having a heart attack than people not taking the pills. IStockphoto hide caption

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Data Dive Suggests Link Between Heartburn Drugs And Heart Attacks

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