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Washington, D.C., Fire and EMS Lt. Keishea Jackson gets a Pfizer coronavirus vaccine shot on Thursday. Shawn Thew-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Shawn Thew-Pool/Getty Images

Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser announced Friday that a member of her staff died from COVID-19, as the number of positive cases of coronavirus climbed to 271 in the nation's capital. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., is at the center of a lawsuit brought by the governments of Maryland and the District of Columbia against President Trump, arguing that his stake in the hotel violates the Constitution's emoluments clauses. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Demonstrators clashed with police on Inauguration Day last year, resulting in more than 200 arrests. The last of those cases have now been dismissed by prosecutors. Stephen J. Boitano/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen J. Boitano/LightRocket via Getty Images

Washington, D.C., is competing against its suburbs in Virginia and Maryland for Amazon's second headquarters. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

D.C. Un-United: Amazon's Second HQ Pits City Vs. Its Suburbs

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Inauguration Day protesters left behind signs, but authorities said they also left a trail of destruction from rioting. A jury disagreed in the first trial over the demonstrations. Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Police and protesters face off on Jan. 20 in Washington, D.C., during President Trump's inauguration. More than 200 people were arrested and charged with rioting. Jury selection began Wednesday, and opening statements in the first trials are set to begin next week. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Workers are busy preparing the stage in Washington, D.C., to be used during the inauguration of Donald Trump on Jan. 20. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Nation's Capital Preps For Both Presidential Supporters And Protesters

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Revisiting A Mother's Day Story Of Separation

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The Landlord and Tenant Branch of Superior Court for the District of Columbia is where landlords in the city sue tenants, usually for not paying their rent. Josh Kramer for NPR hide caption

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Josh Kramer for NPR

Welcome To Rent Court, Where Tenants Can Face A Tenuous Fate

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Adam Eidinger, chairman of the D.C. Cannabis Campaign, puts up Initiative 71 posters in October. The measure to legalize possession of up to 2 ounces of marijuana was approved by a wide margin of local voters. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Voters Said Yes, But D.C. And Congress Continue To Spar Over Pot

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Volunteers with the DC Cannabis Campaign (left and center) talk to a voter on Election Day about the ballot initiative to legalize marijuana. The measure was approved, but its fate remains uncertain. Allison Shelley/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/Getty Images

Samples of carrots cooked three ways are placed on a table for the kids at Walker-Jones Educational Campus, in Washington, D.C., to sample after they have finished lunch. The crowd favorite will later end up on the school lunch menu. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

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Claire Eggers/NPR

Of Carrots And Kids: Healthy School Lunches That Don't Get Tossed

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Early results showed more than a 2-1 lead for a measure to make recreational marijuana use legal in Washington, D.C. A sign promoting the initiative is seen on a corner in the Adams Morgan neighborhood Tuesday. Allison Shelley/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/Getty Images