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Matt Twombly for NPR

Spillover Beasts: Which Animals Pose The Biggest Viral Risk?

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A white-throated round-eared bat (Tonatia silvicola) catches — and munches — a katydid on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. Katydids are "the potato chips of the rain forest," scientists say. Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

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Each year thousands of people from around the world tour the Gomantong Cave in Borneo. Although scientists have found a potentially dangerous virus in bats that roost in the cave, no one has ever gotten sick from a trip here. Razis Nasri hide caption

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Razis Nasri

The Next Pandemic Could Be Dripping On Your Head

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A silver-haired bat, the type that transmitted rabies to a woman in Wyoming after apparently biting her while she slept. Lyn Alweis/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Lyn Alweis/Denver Post via Getty Images

A scientist holds a northern long-eared bat suffering from the white-nose syndrome in LaSalle County, Ill. Steve Taylor/University of Illinois/ U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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Steve Taylor/University of Illinois/ U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Environmentalists Say 'Threatened' Status For Bats Not Enough

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An undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources of a northern long-eared bat. A fungal disease has devastated the species, now listed as threatened. AP hide caption

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AP

Federal Government Protects Bat, Angers Industry

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This October 2008 photo, provided by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, shows a brown bat with its nose crusted in fungus. Ryan von Linden/AP hide caption

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Ryan von Linden/AP

Good News For Bats! Things Are Looking Up For Stemming Disease Spread

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Ecologists found signs of Ebola in a Rousettus leschenaultii fruit bat. These bats are widespread across south Asia, from India to China. Kevin Olival/EcoHealth Alliance hide caption

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Kevin Olival/EcoHealth Alliance

Where Could Ebola Strike Next? Scientists Hunt Virus In Asia

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The Bracken Bat Cave outside San Antonio is home to millions of bats. Here, a few of them emerge from the colony in 2011. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

In Texas, The World's Biggest Bat Colony Is Saved From City Sprawl

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