Mexican food Mexican food

ACP at Cancun Restaurant in Crossville, Tenn. This cheese-covered Southern interpretation of arroz con pollo is not the saffron-colored rice and golden chicken that many Latinos who grew up eating the dish would recognize. But ACP nonetheless helped build Mexican restaurant empires across the South. Gustavo Arellano hide caption

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Gustavo Arellano

Carpenter Antonio Ambrosio Salvador makes Zega-Cola in Santa Ana Zegache, a small village near Oaxaca, Mexico. Zega-Cola was conceived as a locally made alternative to Coca-Cola, which is ubiquitous in Mexico. Nate Guerin hide caption

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Nate Guerin

Earlier this year, the James Beard Foundation named El Güero Canelo an America's Classic, the organization's version of a Hall of Fame award for restaurants. The eatery is most famous for its Sonoran hot dogs, wrapped in bacon, covered in Mexican cream and pinto beans, and placed in a French roll. Gustavo Arellano hide caption

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Gustavo Arellano

Joaquin "Jocko" Fajardo makes a spicy Mexican version of chop suey, a classic American Chinese dish. He tells us how his great-aunt learned to make the dish from the Asian employees at her Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Baked crema Mexicana doughnuts with a blood orange glaze, as featured in the food blog Chicano Eats. On his bilingual blog, Esteban Castillo shares traditional and fusion Mexican recipes. The blog has a stunning, minimalist aesthetic meant to challenge the way people see Mexican food. Esteban Castillo hide caption

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Esteban Castillo

Most people in the world have never experienced the taste of the kind of tortillas Hilda Pastor makes using heirloom corn. That's because of the rise of mass-produced instant corn flour. Marisa Peñaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza/NPR

Imagine a world where you can buy fresh, delicious tacos on every street corner. T. Tseng/Flickr hide caption

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T. Tseng/Flickr

Picture An America With #TacoTrucksOnEveryCorner

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Crepes are a cousin of the enchilada, says Mexican chef Pati Jinich. A vestige of French intervention in Mexico, crepes are now considered classics of Mexican gastronomy. (Above) Jinich's crepe enchiladas with corn, poblano chiles and squash in an avocado-tomatillo sauce. Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originating in Mexico City, suadero tacos have gone from a food of the poor to a widely adored filling. These tacos are made from a variety of meats, including suadero, a cut from the lower parts of a cow. The meat is cooked in a griddle-like device called a comal. Paulo Vidales/Courtesy of Phaidon hide caption

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Paulo Vidales/Courtesy of Phaidon

In the Fortune Garden kitchen in El Centro, Calif., near the Mexican border, cooks speak to each other in Cantonese, and waiters give orders in Spanish. Courtesy of Vickie Ly/KQED hide caption

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Courtesy of Vickie Ly/KQED