Latin America Latin America

A coffee farmer picks fresh coffee cherries in Colombia. New climate research suggests Latin America faces major declines in coffee-growing regions, as well as bees, which help coffee to grow. Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont hide caption

toggle caption
Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont

A recent scuffle between an elotero and a pedestrian in Hollywood re-energized discussion about legalizing street vending in California. Adrian Florido hide caption

toggle caption
Adrian Florido

'I'm Not A Racist, I'm Argentine!'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547013468/547146490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A groundskeeper at Pinecrest Gardens sprays pesticide to kill mosquitoes in Miami-Dade County, Fla., in 2016. Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

Hooded demonstrators equipped with helmets, gas masks and makeshift shields face off against riot police during a protest in Venezuela's capital, Caracas, on Wednesday. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images

A protester stares down riot police behind his gas mask, during demonstrations against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas on Thursday. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images

Tarek El Aissami, then Venezuela's interior minister, holds a press conference in Caracas in April 2012. El Aissami became the country's vice president last month, and the U.S. Treasury Department announced sanctions against him on Monday. Leo Ramirez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Leo Ramirez/AFP/Getty Images

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos makes a peace sign with wife Maria Clemencia Rodriguez after voting in the October referendum. That deal was rejected by voters; both sides hope the new, amended version will find success. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

This peat soil in Sumatra, Indonesia, was formerly a forest. Clearing and draining such land releases huge amounts of greenhouse gases. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

Colombians in the capital, Bogota, hold up the letters for "peace" in Spanish in September. That agreement between the Colombian government and FARC rebels was rejected by voters in an October referendum. An amended agreement was signed Thursday and is expected to be approved. If implemented, it would end 60 years of nonstop conflict in Latin America. Jennifer Alarcon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jennifer Alarcon/AP

Sarai Isaura Gonzalez stars in the music video to Bomba Estereo's "Soy Yo." Via YouTube hide caption

toggle caption
Via YouTube

In 'Soy Yo' Video, Bomba Estéreo Pays Tribute To 'What's Inside Of You'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494382862/494451727" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A mural in the town of Toribio, Colombia, displays an idyllic rural scene. But the reality is that many rural parts of the country are desperately poor and lawless. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images

Countries in Latin America have a range of laws regarding abortion, from completely prohibited to no restrictions. Above: Women in Brazil (at left) demonstrate for abortion rights; a woman at a march in Paraguay (at right) holds a poster reading "If Abortion is Not Wrong, Then Nothing Is Wrong." Christophe Simon and Norberto Duarte/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christophe Simon and Norberto Duarte/Getty Images