medical treatments medical treatments

An 11-year-old boy put small magnets up both nostrils, then couldn't figure out how to get them out. These X-rays tell the tale. The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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The New England Journal of Medicine

Tape worm pills were once advertised as a way to stay thin. Courtesy of Workman Publishing hide caption

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Courtesy of Workman Publishing

'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray

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Sara Wong for NPR

For People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, More Exercise Isn't Better

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Piper Su, seen here with her son, Elliot, lives in Alexandria, Va. She has registered with several transplant centers in hopes of increasing the odds of getting an organ. Courtesy of Piper Su hide caption

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Courtesy of Piper Su

Searching For A Fairer Way To Distribute Donor Livers

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Testing for changes in cells of the cervix or for presence of the HPV virus are both good ways to screen for cervical cancer, health organizations say. GARO/Canopy/Getty Images hide caption

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GARO/Canopy/Getty Images

Third-year students at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine learn how to trim crowns and prep a tooth for a crown. They're also learning to deal with the aftereffects, studying alternatives to opioids for pain relief. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Cheung/NPR

Dental Schools Add An Urgent Lesson: Think Twice About Prescribing Opioids

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The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center had 528 patients in the hospital as Harvey hit. A team of about 1,000 people tended to them and their families until reinforcements arrived Monday. Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center hide caption

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Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center

An 'Army Of People' Helps Houston Cancer Patients Get Treatment

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Dr. R. Michael Tuttle, an endocrinologist at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, talks with Debonis about an ultrasound of the thyroid tumor. Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering hide caption

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Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering

We might all feel a lot better if we saw a view like this, from the North Shore of Oahu, every day. Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images hide caption

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Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images

Scientists have created a treatment in which genetically modified T cells, shown in blue, can attack cancer cells, shown in red. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

FDA Approves First Gene Therapy For Leukemia

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William Scott (right) and his wife, Teresa, arrived at DaVita Med Center Dialysis in Houston on Tuesday morning, after missing William's appointment on Monday. "It's just good he got in here," she says. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'This Is Surreal': Houston Dialysis Center Struggles To Treat Patients

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Avi Ofer for NPR

How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

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