medical treatments medical treatments

Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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Carl Luepker, his son Liam, 12, and daughter Lucia, 11, light the menorah during Hanukkah in their home in Minneapolis, Minn. Carl and Liam both have a degenerative nerve disorder called dystonia. Jenn Ackerman for NPR hide caption

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Jenn Ackerman for NPR

Could Brain Surgery Save A Father And Son?

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

Tylenol May Help Ease The Pain Of Hurt Feelings

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Lauren Kafka rented a machine that delivered cold water and compression to manage pain after rotator cuff surgery. Her insurance company said it wasn't medically necessary and refused to pay for it. Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, shown here testifying before a Senate committee in 2017, says President Trump's top health priority is addressing opioid addiction. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Says Working Together Is Key To Combating Opioid Crisis

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Emily Blair, a medical assistant at the Colon, Stomach and Liver Center in Lansdowne, Va., takes a blood pressure reading for Robert Koenen. New guidelines say that patients should have their arm resting on a surface while taking a reading and both feet should be placed flat on the ground. Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

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Josh Loock/NPR

Odds Are, They're Taking Your Blood Pressure All Wrong

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Is There A Way To Keep Using Opioid Painkillers And Reduce Risk?

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An 11-year-old boy put small magnets up both nostrils, then couldn't figure out how to get them out. These X-rays tell the tale. The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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The New England Journal of Medicine

Tape worm pills were once advertised as a way to stay thin. Courtesy of Workman Publishing hide caption

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Courtesy of Workman Publishing

'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray

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