medical treatments medical treatments

Diabetes alert dogs are trained to detect low blood glucose in a person. The dogs can cost $20,000, but little research has been done on their effectiveness. Frank Wisneski/Flickr hide caption

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Frank Wisneski/Flickr

Between 1999 and 2014, the number of deaths in the U.S. from prescribed opioids quadrupled. Meanwhile medical students were getting very little training on how to spot patients who are at risk for addiction, or how to treat it. Matt Lincol/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Matt Lincol/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

New drugs like Harvoni effectively cure hepatitis C, but they haven't yet been approved for use in children. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Kathy Snook, Terri Anderson and Gary Snook traveled from Montana to Dr. Forest Tennant's office in West Covina, Calif. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Montana's 'Pain Refugees' Leave State To Get Prescribed Opioids

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A demonstration dose of Suboxone film, which is placed under the tongue. It is used to treat opioid addiction. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Maryland Switches Opioid Treatments, And Some Patients Cry Foul

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Community members enjoy a picnic on Gould Farm in Monterey, Mass., in the 1920s. Work on the farm remains a key part of the therapeutic process. Courtesy of Gould Farm hide caption

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Courtesy of Gould Farm

Like many small towns, Bridgton, Maine, had few resources for people seeking treatment for opioid abuse. Susan Sharon/MPBN hide caption

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Susan Sharon/MPBN

A Small Town Bands Together To Provide Opioid Addiction Treatment

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Jonathan McHugh/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Investors See Big Opportunities In Opioid Addiction Treatment

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Zunika Crenshaw helps her 3-year-old daughter Jhase Crenshaw Bass with an asthma inhaler. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Scientists Seek Genetic Clues To Asthma's Toll On Black Children

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Sgt. Jessie Bacon uses the Tactical Communications and Protective System to relay information to his squad in Fort Bliss, Texas. About 20,000 of the devices have been deployed so far. Sgt. Betty Boomer/U.S. Army hide caption

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Sgt. Betty Boomer/U.S. Army

Army's Smart Earplug Damps Explosive Noise, But Can Enhance Whispers

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