medical treatments medical treatments

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center had 528 patients in the hospital as Harvey hit. A team of about 1,000 people tended to them and their families until reinforcements arrived Monday. Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center hide caption

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Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center

An 'Army Of People' Helps Houston Cancer Patients Get Treatment

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Dr. R. Michael Tuttle, an endocrinologist at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, talks with Debonis about an ultrasound of the thyroid tumor. Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering hide caption

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Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering

We might all feel a lot better if we saw a view like this, from the North Shore of Oahu, every day. Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images hide caption

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Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images

Scientists have created a treatment in which genetically modified T cells, shown in blue, can attack cancer cells, shown in red. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

FDA Approves First Gene Therapy For Leukemia

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William Scott (right) and his wife, Teresa, arrived at DaVita Med Center Dialysis in Houston on Tuesday morning, after missing William's appointment on Monday. "It's just good he got in here," she says. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'This Is Surreal': Houston Dialysis Center Struggles To Treat Patients

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Avi Ofer for NPR

How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

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The chip has not been tested in humans, but it has been used to heal wounds in mice. Wexner Medical Center/The Ohio State University hide caption

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Wexner Medical Center/The Ohio State University

The defensive mucus of the Arion subfuscus slug has inspired materials scientists trying to invent better medical adhesives. Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images hide caption

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Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images

Slug Slime Inspires Scientists To Invent Sticky Surgical Glue

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Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has been critical of how the GOP health overhaul bill would affect people in his state. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Neurosurgeon: McCain's Recovery From Brain Surgery Might Take Weeks

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Angie Wang for NPR

The Roots Of Consciousness: We're Of 2 Minds

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When the neurons that release the neurotransmitter dopamine die, people develop Parkinson's disease. Roger J. Bick &/Brian J. Poindexter / UT-Houston/Science Source hide caption

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Roger J. Bick &/Brian J. Poindexter / UT-Houston/Science Source

Brain Cell Transplants Are Being Tested Once Again For Parkinson's

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A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Getty Images/iStockphoto

Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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French pharmaceutical group Sanofi is expected to receive an exclusive license to market a new Zika vaccine. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

States Fear Price Of New Zika Vaccine Will Be More Than They Can Pay

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The good old reflex hammer (like this Taylor model) might seem like an outdated medical device, but its role in diagnosing disease is still as important as ever. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR