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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention traced an ongoing E. coli outbreak to the Central Coastal region of California. If you're sure your lettuce was grown elsewhere, you can eat it. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

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Vegetables were rationed at supermarkets in the U.K. due to poor weather conditions in Europe. Here, lettuce, broccoli and zucchini were rationed at a Tesco store in London. Victoria Jones/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Victoria Jones/PA Images via Getty Images

A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

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