Communist Party Communist Party

Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at the opening ceremony of the 19th Party Congress held at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing last week. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

What Motivates Chinese President Xi Jinping's Anti-Corruption Drive?

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Applause rained down for China's President Xi Jinping on Tuesday, as the Communist Party of China adopted his "thought." Xi (bottom center) was flanked by former presidents (from left) Hu Jintao and Jiang Zemin, along with Premier Li Keqiang. Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks Wednesday at the opening session of the 19th national congress of China's ruling Communist Party at The Great Hall Of The People in Beijing. The congress takes place every five years. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

A bill in California that would remove a ban on members of the Communist Party working in state government was sponsored by Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Oakland, seen here in 2016. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A man takes a selfie near a picture of Chinese President Xi Jinping at an exhibition at a military museum in Beijing on Monday. Xi is expected to use an important meeting this week to re-emphasize his anti-graft campaign. Analysts say the campaign is also used to go after rival factions within the Communist Party. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Behind China's Anti-Graft Campaign, A Drive To Crush Rivals

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A student prays in front of a temporary altar during a rally outside government headquarters in Hong Kong on Sept. 24. Bobby Yip/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Bobby Yip/Reuters /Landov

A Surprising Tie That Binds Hong Kong's Protest Leaders: Faith

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U.S. Communists have been running for office for decades. Above, the Party's presidential ticket in 1936. Ken Rudin collection hide caption

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Ken Rudin collection

April 12 podcast

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