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Allagash employees Salim Raal, left, and Brendan McKay stack bottles of Golden Brett, a limited release beer fermented with a house strain of Brettanomyces yeast. The Maine brewery recently installed solar panels as part of its sustainability initiatives. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

When California Gov. Jerry Brown mandated water cutbacks in 2015, many people responded by having the grass taken out of their lawns and replacing it with more drought-friendly landscaping. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

California's Dire Drought Message Wanes, Conservation Levels Drop

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Gov. Jerry Brown announced mandatory statewide water restrictions at the site of a manual snow survey on April 1, in Phillips, Calif. The recorded level was zero, the lowest in recorded history for California. Max Whittaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Max Whittaker/Getty Images

Santa Barbara Leads California In Cutting Water Use

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At the Pelican Hill golf resort in Newport Coast, Calif., water conservation is an obsession. Yuki Shimazu/Flickr hide caption

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Yuki Shimazu/Flickr

In Record Drought, California Golf Course Ethically Keeps Greens Green

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The Los Angeles River in 2013. Engineers turned it into a narrow concrete channel in the 1940s, after a flood destroyed homes and left 100 people dead in 1938. Steve Lyon/Flickr hide caption

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Steve Lyon/Flickr

Building Sponge City: Redesigning LA For Long-Term Drought

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Homeowners can receive up to $4,000 for replacing their lawns with less thirsty plantings, in a rebate program run by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. iStock hide caption

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iStock

Access to fresh water is not a given for many, including this Indian girl carrying bottles of drinking water filled from a municipal tap two kilometers from her village. Indranil Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Indranil Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images