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Insomnia has become even more common, sleep specialists say, with the rise of "collective social anxiety." Aaron McCoy/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron McCoy/Getty Images

How to get sleep in uneasy times

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More Americans have been getting less than seven hours of sleep a night in the past several years, especially in professions such as health care. ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

Working Americans Are Getting Less Sleep, Especially Those Who Save Our Lives

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Sleep scientists say the power of a warm bedtime bath to trigger sleepiness likely has to do, paradoxically, with cooling the body's core temperature. PhotoTalk/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoTalk/Getty Images

Different parts of the brain aren't always in the same stage of sleep at the same time, notes neurologist and author Guy Leschziner. When this happens, an individual might order a pizza or go out for a drive — while technically still being fast asleep. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

From Insomnia To Sexsomnia, Unlocking The 'Secret World' Of Sleep

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A 20-minute nap refreshes. Just don't sleep in so long on Sunday morning that you find it hard to fall asleep Sunday night. Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Nappuccinos To Weekend Z's: Strategize To Catch Up On Lost Sleep

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A CPAP machine can treat obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder which causes people to temporarily stop breathing throughout the night. But the machines, which blow air into a person's airways, take some getting used to. Brandon Thibodeaux/ProPublica hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux/ProPublica

Some apps, like CBT-I Coach, use proven scientific methods to help people manage their underlying sleep challenges. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Some Apps May Help Curb Insomnia, Others Just Put You To Sleep

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Think you can get away with fewer than eight hours of sleep per night? Neuroscientist Matthew Walker says, think again. Sophie Blackall/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Sophie Blackall/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Think you can get away with fewer than eight hours of sleep per night? Neuroscientist Matthew Walker says — think again. Sophie Blackall/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Sophie Blackall/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The "Swiss Army Knife" Of Health: A Good Night's Sleep

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Do we really need sleep? Mark Conlan/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mark Conlan/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Eleven Days Without Sleep: The Haunting Effects Of A Record-Breaking Stunt

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Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

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The back of your throat relaxes when you sleep, and that can cause the airway to vibrate — in a thundering snore. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Do Anti-Snoring Gadgets Really Work?

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Rough night? Depending on specific tweaks to their genes, some fruit flies have trouble falling asleep, and others can't stay asleep. Getting too little shut-eye hurts their memory. David M. Phillips/Science Source hide caption

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David M. Phillips/Science Source

How Research On Sleepless Fruit Flies Could Help Human Insomniacs

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About 10 percent of Americans have chronic insomnia. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

There's more than one reason to aim for a good night's sleep. Charles Taylor/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Charles Taylor/iStockphoto.com

CPAP masks have become much more comfortable than in years past, doctors say. But most of the time, they're probably not the first thing to try for sleep apnea. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com