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An artist's reconstruction of Ledumahadi mafube, which means "a giant thunderclap at dawn," foraging during the early Jurassic in South Africa. Viktor Radermacher, University of the Witwatersrand hide caption

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Viktor Radermacher, University of the Witwatersrand

Bones Reveal The Brontosaurus Had An Older, Massive Cousin In South Africa

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A CT-scan image of the skull of an ancient bird shows how one of the earliest bird beaks worked as a pincer, in the way beaks of modern birds do, but also had teeth left over from dinosaur ancestors. The animal, called Ichthyornis, lived around 100 million years ago in what is now North America. Michael Hanson and Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar/Nature Publishing Group hide caption

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Michael Hanson and Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar/Nature Publishing Group

How Did Birds Lose Their Teeth And Get Their Beaks? Study Offers Clues

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A tick grasping a dinosaur feather is preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications hide caption

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Peñalver et al/Nature Communications

Amber-Trapped Tick Suggests Ancient Bloodsuckers Feasted On Feathered Dinosaurs

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A duck-billed dinosaur skeleton, which the researchers think ate crustaceans, on display in 2009 at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The massive dinosaur stands on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City last year. The plant-eating giant, which could not even fit in a single room, would have weighed more than 70 tons — or nearly the same as an empty space shuttle. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

An African cheetah (acinonyx jubatus lanea) at Inverdoorn Game Reservein South Africa. Thierry Falise/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Falise/LightRocket via Getty Images

New Research Suggests Why Mid-Sized Animals Are The Fastest

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In an artist's rendering, a gigantic, cassowarylike dinosaur named Beibeilong, which lived some 90 million years ago, incubates its eggs. Zhao Chuang/Nature Communications hide caption

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Zhao Chuang/Nature Communications

A baby dinosaur's tail is encased in amber along with ants, a beetle and plant fragments. Ryan McKellar/Royal Saskatchewan Museum hide caption

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Ryan McKellar/Royal Saskatchewan Museum

Baby Dinosaur's 99 Million-Year-Old Tail, Encased In Amber, Surfaces In Myanmar

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A computer illustration of a large asteroid colliding with Earth. (Size may not be to scale.) Such an impact is believed to have led to the death of the dinosaurs some 66 million years ago. Mark Garlick /Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

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Mark Garlick /Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM
Maia Stern, Adam Cole/NPR

Watch Earth's History Play Out On A Football Field

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This rock was found on a British beach. Some scientists believe it could contain fossilized brain tissue. Jamie Hiscocks/University of Cambridge hide caption

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Jamie Hiscocks/University of Cambridge

Researchers Say They've Found A Bit Of Fossilized Dinosaur Brain

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The newly discovered dinosaur species Savannasaurus elliottorum was about half the length of a basketball court and lived some 95 million years ago. Travis Tischler/Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History hide caption

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Travis Tischler/Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History

Geophysicists announced this week that they have successfully collected key samples from the site of the asteroid strike that likely wiped out the dinosaurs. Joe Tucciarone/Science Source hide caption

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Joe Tucciarone/Science Source

Geologists Find Clues In Crater Left By Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid

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Sauropods were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs to ever walk the Earth. New research helps explain why. Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

Superhearing And Fast Growth ... Scientists Learn Why Sauropods Ruled

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An artist's rendering of sauropods that once roamed in a lagoon area on Scotland's Isle of Skye. Jon Hoad/University of Edinburgh hide caption

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Jon Hoad/University of Edinburgh

Before There Were Tourists, Dinosaurs Strolled Scotland's Isle Of Skye

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A team of blacksmiths, welders, artists and scientists have been working together in Canada to mount the T. rex bones without damaging them. Metal cradles hold 150 of the major bones precisely in place. Research Casting International hide caption

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Research Casting International

'Nation's T. Rex' Strikes A Rapacious Pose

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An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long. Rainer Schoch/Nature hide caption

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Rainer Schoch/Nature

How The Turtle Got Its Shell

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The skull of a Giganotosaurus. Courtesy Don Lessem hide caption

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Courtesy Don Lessem

Bankrolling A Dinosaur Dig And Unearthing A Giant: The Giganotosaurus

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