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People watch coverage of the NCAA college basketball tournament at the Westgate SuperBook on March 15 in Las Vegas. Several states are expected to allow sports gaming after Monday's Supreme Court ruling. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

States Eye New Revenues After Supreme Court Backs Legal Sports Betting

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Proposition bets for Super Bowl LI are displayed at the Race & Sports SuperBook at the Westgate Las Vegas Resort & Casino on Jan. 26 in Las Vegas, Nev. — one of four states where sports betting is legal. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Sports Betting Ruling Could Have Consequences, Especially For College Athletes

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Steve Wynn, CEO of Wynn Resorts, attends a news conference held by President Trump in the East Room of the White House in July. The president was touting a decision by Apple supplier Foxconn to invest $10 billion to build a factory in Wisconsin that produces LCD panels. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman wins the lottery not once, not twice, but four times. What are the odds? According to mathematician Joseph Mazur, it depends on how you ask the question. Amy Sancetta/AP hide caption

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Amy Sancetta/AP

Magic, or Math? The Appeal of Coincidences, and The Reality

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Both the North Carolina Tar Heels and the Virginia Cavaliers, who squared off in the ACC Championship on Saturday, were awarded No. 1 seeds in the NCAA tournament. Rob Carr/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Carr/Getty Images

New York's attorney general's office has filed lawsuits against the two biggest daily fantasy sports companies, FanDuel and DraftKings, demanding that they stop taking bets in New York. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Skill Or Chance? Question Looms Over Fantasy Sports Industry

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A view of Atlantic City, N.J., in October. Two of the towering casinos in this photo, the Showboat (third tower from left) and the Revel (far right) closed last year. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post

In Atlantic City, A Silver Lining For Casinos Left Standing

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A man watches sports broadcast on screens at a sports book owned and operated by CG Technology in Las Vegas. CG Technology is asking the Nevada Gaming Control Board to allow betting on the Olympics. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Nevada's Gaming Commission Considers Olympic Wagers

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Paul Smith, a single father and a longtime cook at the Trump Taj Mahal Casino in Atlantic City, is worried about losing his health benefits if the casino closes in December. Rob Szypko/NPR hide caption

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Rob Szypko/NPR

Workers Say Employers In Ailing Atlantic City Hold All The Cards

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Atlantic City, N.J., has seen four casinos close this year, and a fifth may soon follow. Officials are trying to diversify the city's economy by weaning itself from gambling, its biggest industry. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

As Casinos Fold, Stakes Are High For Atlantic City Transformation

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A woman gathers shells along the ocean near the Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, N.J., early Tuesday. The casino resort has closed, a little over two years after opening with the promise of helping to renew Atlantic City. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

After Just Two Years, Huge Atlantic City Casino Shuts Down

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