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Airmen use a ground-control station cockpit to control remotely piloted aircraft Nov. 17 during a training mission at Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nev. The Pentagon plans to remotely piloted aircraft flights by as much as 50 percent in the next few years to meet increased needs for surveillance, reconnaissance and lethal airstrikes around the world. Isaac Brekken/Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Brekken/Getty Images

Air Force Unveils Plan To Improve Conditions For Drone Operators

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The Drone War's Bottleneck: Too Many Targets, Not Enough Pilots

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An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan, in 2010. A new report questions the U.S. policy of using armed drones abroad to carry out attacks on suspected terrorists. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

A U.S. drone in the sky over Kandahar Air Field in Afghanistan. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif met with President Obama at the White House on Wednesday. Dennis Brack/pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Dennis Brack/pool/Getty Images

Last month, protesters in Multan, Pakistan, expressed their anger about U.S. drone strikes. S.S. Mirza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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S.S. Mirza/AFP/Getty Images

On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Philip Reeves discusses the Amnesty International report on U.S. drone strikes

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An American flag flying over Camp VI, where detainees are housed at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay. Bob Strong /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Bob Strong /Reuters /Landov

An unmanned drone armed with Hellfire missiles is shown over southern Afghanistan. A Hellfire missile fired from a drone was used in 2011 to kill an American in Yemen who the Obama administration says was an al-Qaida leader. Another American died in that attack, and a 16-year-old American was killed in a separate drone strike. Lt. Col. Leslie Pratt/AP hide caption

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Lt. Col. Leslie Pratt/AP

John Brennan, President Obama's nominee to head the CIA, prepares to testify at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

October 2011: Men stand on the rubble of a building destroyed by a U.S. drone strike in southeastern Yemen. Among those killed was U.S. citizen Abdulrahman al-Awlaki, the son of U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki — who himself was killed by a drone strike the month before. Khaled Abdullah /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Khaled Abdullah /Reuters /Landov

President Obama and John Brennan, his top counterterrorism adviser, in the Oval Office on Jan. 4, 2010. Brennan is a key voice about who gets put on the "kill list." Pete Souza/White House hide caption

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Pete Souza/White House

A 'Macabre' Process: Nominating Terrorists To Nation's 'Kill List'

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