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The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

Food assistance recipients spend about 10 percent of their food budget on sugary drinks, while the rest of the population spends about 7 percent. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Over three years, a campaign urged Howard County, Md., residents to pare back on sugary drinks — through ads, social media, health counseling and changes to what vending machines sold. And it worked. Adrian Burke/Getty Images hide caption

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Adrian Burke/Getty Images

Bottles of Fanta are displayed in a food truck's cooler in 2014 in San Francisco. The city is one of several in California that have a soda tax on the ballot this November. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Trick Or Treat? Critics Blast Big Soda's Efforts To Fend Off Taxes

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Khadija Sabir of Lovie Lee's Stars of Tomorrow preschool in Philadelphia attends a soda tax rally with three of her charges. The proposed tax promises to pay for universal pre-K, parks and recreation centers. Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

Philly Wants To Tax Soda To Raise Money For Schools

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A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates in 2015. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

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California Center for Public Health Advocacy

A daily habit of sugary-sweetened drinks can boost your risk of developing the disease — even if you're not overweight. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Even If You're Lean, 1 Soda Per Day Ups Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

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A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

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California Center for Public Health Advocacy

The University of California's Nutrition Policy Institute has proposed that MyPlate include an icon for water. UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources hide caption

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UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources