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antibiotic resistance

Scientists have isolated a molecule with disease-fighting potential in a microbe living on a type of fungus-farming ant (genus Cyphomyrmex). The microbe kills off other hostile microbes attacking the ants' fungus, a food source. Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin

A customer holds a McDonald's Big Mac. The fast-food giant, one of the world's biggest beef buyers, has announced plans to use its might to cut back on antibiotics in its global beef supply. Environmentalists are applauding the commitment. Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Humans would do better to accept many of the life forms that share our space, than to scrub them all away, says ecologist Rob Dunn. Basic Books hide caption

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Basic Books

Counting The Bugs And Bacteria, You're 'Never Home Alone' (And That's OK)

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Colored transmission electron micrograph of a section through an Escherichia coli bacterium. This rod-shaped bacterium moves via its hair-like flagellae (yellow). Kwangshin Kim/Science Source hide caption

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Kwangshin Kim/Science Source

Could Probiotics Protect Kids From A Downside Of Antibiotics?

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In the 1950s, the poultry industry began dunking birds in antibiotic baths. It was supposed to keep meat fresher and healthier. That's not what happened, as Maryn McKenna recounts in her new book. Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Express/Getty Images

On the list of pathogens (from left): Staphylococcus aureus (causes skin infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (causes blood infections, pneumonia, infections after surgery) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (causes the sexually-transmitted disease gonorrhea). NIAID; Scott Chimileski and Roberto Kolter, NIH Image Gallery/Flickr; NIAID hide caption

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NIAID; Scott Chimileski and Roberto Kolter, NIH Image Gallery/Flickr; NIAID

Heat and steam from your shower or shave can rob medicine of its potency long before the drug's expiration date. Angela Cappetta/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Cappetta/Getty Images

When Old Medicine Goes Bad

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Antibiotic- and growth-hormone-free cattle gather at a farm in Yamhill, Ore. Despite farmers pledging to reduce or stop antibiotics use, a new report finds that sales of antibiotics for use on farms are going up. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles has been penalized in all three years since the creation of a Medicare program to reduce patient-safety issues in hospitals. FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images hide caption

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FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images

The bacteria were discovered in New Mexico's Lechuguilla Cave — a part of Carlsbad Caverns and the second deepest cave in the continental U.S. Courtesy of Max Wisshak hide caption

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Courtesy of Max Wisshak

Million-Year-Old 'Hero Bug' Emerges From Cave

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Chickens at a poultry farm in Hefei, eastern China. Antibiotics are often used to keep them healthy in densely packed quarters. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

U.N. Pledges To Fight Antibiotic Resistance In Historic Agreement

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Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

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Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

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Mostly Harmless/Flickr

'Nose-y' Bacteria Could Yield A New Way To Fight Infection

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