cholera cholera

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, pictured during a 2014 visit to Haiti to inaugurate a sanitation campaign. On Thursday, he issued an apology that Haitians have been demanding for six years. Hector Retamal /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal /AFP/Getty Images

A child receives the second dose of the vaccine against cholera in Saut d'Eau, Haiti, in a 2014 campaign. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Haiti Launches Largest-Ever Cholera Vaccination Campaign

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A young Haitian suffering from cholera symptoms receives medical attention Saturday at Saint Antoine Hospital of Jeremie in southwestern Haiti. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Linked To Haiti Cholera Outbreak, U.N. Considers Paying Millions In Compensation

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Dr. Paul Farmer, co-founder of Partners In Health, stands with Mirlande Estenale in front of what used to be her home in the town of Les Cayes, Haiti. Liz Campa/Partners In Health hide caption

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Liz Campa/Partners In Health

Haitians protest in front of a U.N. office on Oct. 15, 2015, demanding reparations for families of people who suffered or died from cholera. The outbreak started in 2010, claiming some 9,000 lives. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Debate Continues Over U.N. Role In Bringing Cholera To Haiti

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Health workers collect the body of a cholera victim in Petionville, Haiti, in February 2011. The disease first appeared on the island in October 2010, likely introduced by U.N. peacekeepers from Nepal, possibly a single individual. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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A family receives treatment for cholera at a clinic run by Doctors Without Borders in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in October 2011, a year after the overwhelming outbreak began. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Health workers collect the body of a cholera victim in Petionville, Haiti, February 2011. The cholera outbreak in Haiti began in October 2010. Nearly 9,000 people have died. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Cholera Surges In Haiti As Rain Arrives Early

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Village chiefs, residents and government officials take to the streets to celebrate the Chienge district's accomplishment of bringing sanitation to every home. Mark Maseko/Courtesy of UNICEF Zambia hide caption

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Mark Maseko/Courtesy of UNICEF Zambia

After the earthquake in 2010, about 1,000 people were living in tents on the median of Highway 2, one of Haiti's busiest roads. Five years later, tens of thousands of people in Port-au-Prince still live in tents and other temporary housing. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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