leukemia leukemia
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leukemia

Aaron Reid, 20, rests in an exam room in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

Update: A Young Man's Experiment With A 'Living Drug' For Leukemia

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Patient Aaron Reid receives (CAR) T-cell therapy at the NIH in Bethesda, MD. The process took five minutes to complete. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

Scientists Race To Improve 'Living Drugs' To Fight Cancer

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Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

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Scientists have created a treatment in which genetically modified T cells, shown in blue, can attack cancer cells, shown in red. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

FDA Approves First Gene Therapy For Leukemia

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Image of a CAR-T cell (reddish) attacking a leukemia cell (green). These CAR-T lymphocytes are used for immunotherapy against cancer (CAR stands for chimeric antigen receptor). After the proliferation of the CAR-expressing T cells, they are transfused back into the patient and can directly detect the cancer cells carrying the antigen. Eye of Science/Science Source hide caption

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Eye of Science/Science Source

'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing Immune System Clears Key Hurdle

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Music therapist Brian Schreck began working with Nate Kramer after he was diagnosed with leukemia. Together, they recorded a song of Nate's heartbeat layered over melodies. Courtesy of Brian Schreck hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Schreck

Heartbeat Music: Parents Remember Their Son Through His Song Of Life

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A colored magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain of a 76-year-old patient with dementia shows the brain has atrophied and the dark brown fluid-filled spaces have become enlarged. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

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Zephyr/Science Source

Cancer Drug That Might Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Headed For Bigger Tests

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