Oregon Oregon

Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, right, speaks with his disciples in this undated photo in Rajneeshpuram, Ore. Jack Smith/AP hide caption

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Jack Smith/AP

Religion, Libertarian Cults And The American West In 'Wild Wild Country'

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A sign in support of Oregon's Measure 101 is displayed by a homeowner along a roadside in Lake Oswego, Ore. Tuesday's special election puts decisions over how the state funds Medicaid in voters' hands. Gillian Flaccus/AP hide caption

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Gillian Flaccus/AP

Part Of Oregon's Funding Plan For Medicaid Goes Before Voters

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Chicken blinchiki from Kachka. Leela Cyd/Courtesy of Flatiron Books hide caption

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Leela Cyd/Courtesy of Flatiron Books

Kachka: The Word That Saved A Family During WWII And Inspired A Chef

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Belinda Batten of Oregon State University stands in front of a wave energy generator prototype. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Oceans May Host Next Wave Of Renewable Energy

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At the Cathedral Ridge Winery in Hood River, Ore., smoke has poured into the property and there are worries it could alter the taste of the grapes. Molly Solomon/OPB hide caption

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Molly Solomon/OPB

A farm worker runs a tine weeder on Jason Hunton's organic wheat crop. It's like a giant comb, scraping up weeds and bits of wheat along with it. Courtney Flatt/Northwest Public Radio hide caption

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Courtney Flatt/Northwest Public Radio

The headquarters of Oregon's Driver and Motor Vehicles Division on Thursday in Salem, Ore. Oregon became the first state to allow residents to mark their gender as "not specified" on applications for driver's licenses. Andrew Selsky/AP hide caption

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Andrew Selsky/AP

In Portland, Ore., a May 1 rally and march began as a peaceful demonstration but later "devolved into a full-scale riot," police say. Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Workers watch as wooden boards move across a wood planer inside Seneca Sawmill Company in Eugene, Ore. It sits in the state's 4th congressional district — which Donald Trump almost won. Geoff Bennett/NPR hide caption

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Geoff Bennett/NPR

An Opening For Trump In Deep Blue Oregon

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Micah White, co-creator of the Occupy Wall Street movement, now lives in Nehalem, Ore., where he's active in local politics. "There are no big businesses here. These are all my neighbors. You can't block traffic," he says. Trav Williams hide caption

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Trav Williams

Message To 'Resistors' From Occupy Co-Creator: Stop Protesting. Run For Office

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Four participants in last year's armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon were convicted of crimes on Friday. Darryl Thorn and Jason Patrick (left) were convicted on conspiracy charges, while Jake Ryan and Duane Ehmer (right) were convicted of depredation of government property. Multnomah County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Multnomah County Sheriff's Office via AP

Ammon Bundy, the leader of an anti-government militia, carries a copy of the U.S. Constitution in his pocket. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Bundy Militia Not Backing Down Following Oregon Trial Acquittal

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Although expanding Medicaid in Oregon didn't drive down the recipients' overall use of hospital emergency rooms, the state has seen a decline in avoidable use of ERs by 4 percent in the past two years, according to state statistics. Paul Burns/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Burns/Getty Images

Emergency Room Use Stays High In Oregon Medicaid Study

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This rock formation at Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area — shown in October 2008 — was apparently destroyed by vandals. The sandstone pedestal, which was found in pieces last week, was roughly 7 feet to 10 feet across and located in a fenced-off section of the park. Chelsea Rutherford/KATU News via AP hide caption

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Chelsea Rutherford/KATU News via AP

Amber Lakin (front) and colleague Julia Porras work at Central City Concern, an organization that does outreach and job training to combat homelessness and addiction in Portland, Ore. Lakin went through the welfare system and now works with Central City Coffee, an offshoot of the main organization, which uses coffee roasting/packaging as a job training space. Leah Nash for NPR hide caption

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Leah Nash for NPR

20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

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Jamie Shupe, 52, was born male, married a woman and had a child. But Shupe felt neither male nor fully female. Now, an Oregon judge has allowed Shupe to identify as non-binary, believed to be a first in the United States. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB News hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB News

Neither Male Nor Female: Oregon Resident Legally Recognized As Third Gender

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