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Workers pull out cosmetically defective garlic (that will be processed separately) at the Christopher Ranch processing plant in Gilroy, Calif. About 6 percent of its garlic is bought from China; the rest is homegrown. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

In Garlic Capital, Tariffs And Immigration Crackdown Have Mixed Impacts

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Chinese shoppers spend their time next to a bench painted with the U.S. flag at the capital city's popular shopping mall in Beijing. During trade talks this week, the two sides face potentially lengthy wrangling over technology and the future of their economic relationship. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed Saturday to a 90-day halt on new tariffs, hailed as a cease-fire in the countries' trade war. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Cargo containers are loaded on ships at a port in Qingdao in China's eastern Shandong province in April. China said it will impose tariffs of 5 percent to 10 percent on $60 billion worth of U.S. products, starting on Monday. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

The Big Iron Farm Show draws thousands of farmers and farm equipment-makers to a fairground in West Fargo, N.D. For many this year, concerns about crop yields have been eclipsed by worries about President Trump's trade policies. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Jim Zarroli/NPR

Farmers Hope For China Trade Deal, But For Now They Worry About Tariffs' Impact

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The Ford Focus Active, a small crossover car currently sold in Europe, was slated to begin production in China for the U.S. market. Ford canceled those plans, citing tariffs imposed by the Trump administration. Ford Motor Company hide caption

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Ford Motor Company

Rockland Industries employs about 240 people, including Kim Fisk (left) and Mitchell Sapp, who work at the textile company's manufacturing plant in Bamberg, S.C. Courtesy of Rockland Industries hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockland Industries

Andrea Conyers and her daughter Aviana, 7, went back-to-school shopping in Hinesville, Ga., earlier this month. Charlotte Norsworthy/NPR hide caption

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Charlotte Norsworthy/NPR

What's In Your Shopping Cart? A Battleground For Global Trade

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The Trump administration has imposed tariffs on hundreds of products. China, Canada, Mexico and the European Union have retaliated. We'd love to hear about how the tariffs are affecting your business, your work, your shopping habits or your life. Elly Walton/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Elly Walton/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Eve Clark, 10, and Maggie Berry, 17, help with chores at Vision Aire Farms. They are seen in the barn, adjacent to the milking parlor. Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism hide caption

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Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

For Wisconsin's Dairy Farmers, Tariffs Could Reshape The Race For The Senate

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Deb Eisenhawer assembles a switch for a washing machine at a Whirlpool plant in Clyde, Ohio. The company's CEO says steel costs have reached "unexplainable levels." Aaron Josefczyk/Reuters hide caption

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Aaron Josefczyk/Reuters

From Mills To Manufacturers, Steel Tariffs Produce Winners And Losers

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Containers are transferred at a port in Qingdao in China's eastern Shandong province on July 6. China has announced a plan to impose more tariffs on U.S. goods, in response to escalating trade threats from the Trump administration. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration threatened to raise proposed tariffs on Chinese imports from 10 percent to 25 percent, escalating U.S. trade tensions with Beijing. Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Brian Snyder/Reuters

Trump Administration Threatens Even Higher Tariffs On China

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Steve Tramell is mayor of West Point, Ga., home to a Kia auto plant that employs thousands. He's worried about the potential impacts that proposed import tariffs on auto parts and cars would have on his town. Johnny Kauffman /WABE hide caption

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Johnny Kauffman /WABE

Trump's Proposed Auto Tariffs Threaten Kia Plant In Georgia

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White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow speaks during a meeting between President Donald Trump and governors and lawmakers at the White House in April 2018. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Young hogs are seen at a farm in Farmville, N.C. From farmers to meat-storage facilities, to auto parts manufacturers, the impact of tariffs is spreading. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Tariffs Are Having A Chilling Effect On More U.S. Businesses

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Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell faced questions before the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday about the effects of President Trump's trade policies. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (from left), Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and European Council President Donald Tusk conclude their news conference at the Japan-EU summit on Tuesday in Tokyo. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP