Tariffs Tariffs
Stories About

Tariffs

In a speech at the Economic Club of New York on Tuesday, President Trump said a mini trade agreement with China could happen "soon," but he offered no guarantees. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Trump Makes No Promises On China Trade Deal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/778517074/778632625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Goldfish, like these showcased at Tokyo's Nihonbashi Art Aquarium, have been bred in China over centuries, into forms so varied and rare that one can be worth hundreds of dollars. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

The Goldfish Tariff: Fancy Pet Fish Among The Stranger Casualties Of The Trade War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/768553956/770569002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers in green polo shirts and blue caps monitor machines making plastic products at the Dongguan Fangjie Printing and Packaging Company. Jolie Myers/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jolie Myers/NPR

Has The Trade War Taken A Bite Out Of China's Economy? Yes — But It's Complicated

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/768569711/769044855" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A worker assembles an industrial valve at Emerson Electric Co.'s factory in Marshalltown, Iowa. The manufacturing sector has seen a slowdown amid the ongoing trade war. Tim Aeppel/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Aeppel/Reuters

Hiring Steady As Employers Add 136,000 Jobs; Unemployment Dips To 3.5%

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/766990669/767339513" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With a growing number of imports from China facing tariffs, some companies are trying to avoid those costs by falsely labeling Chinese products as manufactured elsewhere. YinYang/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
YinYang/Getty Images

A Mysterious Pencil Factory Sharpens Focus On Tariff Scams

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/763537209/764390207" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Daniel Wood/NPR

NPR Shopping Cart Economics: How Prices Changed At A Walmart In 1 Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753712449/761126919" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Designer Isaac Mizrahi (left) embraces Robert D'Loren, CEO of Xcel Brands, which once manufactured 70% of its clothes in China. Today that's down to about 20%. The company now manufacturers in a variety of countries, including Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan McDermid/Reuters

China Falls Out Of Fashion For Some U.S. Brands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/755498788/755752383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Visitors look at a Cadillac Escalade at the China Auto Show in Beijing in 2018. For General Motors, China is a bigger market than the United States. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

U.S. Companies In China Get Caught In The Trade War Crossfire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/754777224/754811338" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (center left) shakes hands with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He at a conference center in Shanghai on July 31. Trade talks are expected to resume in September. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ng Han Guan/AP

China's Leaders Are Divided Over Trade War With U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753145197/754485126" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump announced higher U.S. tariffs on goods from China. "Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China," he tweeted. It was unclear what Trump could do to force U.S. firms to make such a move. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

A group representing importers said it was gratified that the Trump administration is lifting the tariffs on Mexican tomatoes. But it cautioned that beefed-up inspections could act as another barrier to free trade. Anna-Rose Gassot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna-Rose Gassot/AFP/Getty Images

Frog meat is among the many items imported from China that had been facing tariffs in a few weeks, but now the tariffs are delayed until December. Emmanuelle Bonzami/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Emmanuelle Bonzami/EyeEm/Getty Images

A truck passes a stack of China Shipping containers at the Port of Savannah in Georgia on July 5, 2018. The Trump administration is delaying some tariffs from taking effect until December. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen B. Morton/AP

Trump Administration Delays Some China Tariffs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/750770595/750947046" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"What really does set this list of products apart from all of the earlier tariffs are it's basically consumer goods," said Chad Bown, a trade analyst at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. "It's clothing, and toys, iPhones." John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

Get Ready For Higher Prices If New Tariffs Hit Goods From China, Retailers Warn

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747713371/747719549" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A container ship sits in a berth at the Port of Oakland in California last year. President Trump announced additional tariffs on imports from China on Thursday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (left) looks on as U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer speaks with and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He in Shanghai on Wednesday. Ng Han Guan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ng Han Guan/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (from left), U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He gather for a meeting in Beijing on May 1. They are meeting again in Shanghai this week. Andy Wong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Wong/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands during a business leaders event in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017. The two leaders are expected to discuss trade at this week's Group of 20 summit in Japan. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump and China's President Xi Jinping are expected to talk about trade on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, later this month. Thomas Peter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Peter/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Turns Trade Talks Into Spectator Sport

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/732466203/732480747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An employee works at a wiring harness and cable assembly manufacturing company in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, that exports to the U.S. in 2017. The auto industry says threatened tariffs would play havoc with supply chains. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Ohio To Juárez And Back Again: Why Tariffs On Mexico Alarm The Auto Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/730042347/730057558" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trucks are seen heading into the United States from Mexico along the Bridge of the Americas in El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday. U.S. industries say President Trump's threatened tariffs on goods from Mexico raised uncertainty just as they were looking forward to a new trade agreement. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

White House's About-Face On Mexican Trade A 'Gut Punch' To U.S. Businesses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/729591658/729737546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript