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Saudi Arabian women's rights activist Loujain Alhathloul appeared in court with several other women for the first time since her arrest and detention in May 2018. Marieke Wijntjes via Reuters hide caption

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Marieke Wijntjes via Reuters

Saudi Women's Rights Activists Appear In Riyadh Court

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Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun, 18, addresses the media during a news conference at a refugee resettling agency in Toronto on Jan. 15. She pledged to "work in support of freedom for women around the world, the same freedom I experienced on the first day I arrived in Canada." Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Kingdom Tries To Prevent More Women From Fleeing

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Friends of Loujain al-Hathloul made a photo to parody a Vogue Arabia cover image showing a Saudi princess in a red convertible. Pictured here (left to right) are Ayendri Ishani Ridell, Urooba Jamal, Narissa Diwan, Atiya Jaffar and Rauza Khan. Hathloul "took a huge risk to advance women's rights in her country," Jamal says, "and now is facing the most heinous injustices." Doaa Jamal hide caption

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Doaa Jamal

Concern Grows For Loujain Al-Hathloul, Jailed Saudi Women's Driving Activist

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Suhai Aziz Talpur, seen in her office in Karachi's Clifton police station, has emerged as a hero in Pakistan after she led a mission to take down militants who stormed the Chinese consulate in November. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Bhanwari Devi worked for her local municipality in rural Rajasthan, northern India, when she says she was gang-raped in 1992 by higher-caste men in the area, allegedly because they disapproved of her campaign to end child marriage. Her case went all the way to India's Supreme Court and led to the country's first workplace sexual harassment guidelines. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Saudi men and women browse the annual Riyadh International Book Exhibition in 2016. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

From California, A Saudi Woman Fights Her Country's Strict Male Guardianship Laws

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Claudia Sheinbaum, the leading candidate for mayor of Mexico City and Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the frontrunner for president, attend the final event of the 2018 campaign in Mexico City on Wednesday. "Just because I might look like a skinny scientist doesn't mean I'm not going to crack down on crime here. I will," she told a crowd recently. Manuel Velasquez/Getty Images hide caption

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Manuel Velasquez/Getty Images

In Mexico's Elections, Women Are Running In Unprecedented Numbers

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A Saudi woman celebrates with her friends as she drives her car in al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, on Sunday. The lifting of the ban on women driving marks a milestone for women in the kingdom who have had to rely on drivers, male relatives, taxis and ride-hailing services to get to work, go shopping and simply move around. Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters hide caption

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Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters

Mehnaz (center) is one of 12 female lawyers in an administrative district with 700,000 people. There are about 500 male lawyers in the district. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

'I Want Women To Have Rights Like Men,' Says Lawyer In Pakistan's Swat Valley

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Chinese President Xi Jinping visits the Marxist literature center at Peking University, long a bastion of patriotic student activism, in Beijing on Wednesday. Xi has pushed China's universities to enforce ideological conformity and avoid discussing constitutional democracy, civil society and judicial independence. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

For 45 years, Susan B. Anthony traveled the U.S. relentlessly, stumping for women's rights. She endured ridicule, was hanged in effigy and faced many horrid meals on the road. Nevertheless, she persisted. Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Corbis via Getty Images

Tunisian women gather to celebrate Women's Day on Aug. 13 in Tunis. On the same day, the country's president announced the review of a law requiring that a man receive twice the share of an inheritance as a woman. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Antonio Guterres, the newly elected United Nations secretary-general and former prime minister of Portugal, delivers remarks at U.N. headquarters on Thursday in New York City. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Mukhtar Mai has fought for justice for the past 14 years. Pakistan's Supreme Court has said it will review its own 2011 decision to uphold the acquittal of five of her attackers. Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

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Philip Reeves/NPR

Majd kept a journal about a time in her life when she was torn between getting married or going to school. Courtesy of Madj hide caption

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Courtesy of Madj

Diary Of A Saudi Girl: Karate Lover, Science Nerd ... Bride?

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Egypt's justice ministry says it will begin strictly enforcing a law requiring foreign men to pay to marry a woman 25 years younger or more. Human rights groups say the law only bolsters a business that preys on the poor and the vulnerable. George Peters/Getty Images hide caption

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George Peters/Getty Images

Does Egypt's Law Protect 'Short-Term Brides' Or Formalize Trafficking?

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Aniket Sathe, 15, is in a program that's trying to persuade India's boys to treat girls as their equals. Here he's pictured with his younger sister, Aarati, 12, waiting for the rain to stop before walking her to school. Poulomi Basu / VII Photo/for NPR hide caption

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Poulomi Basu / VII Photo/for NPR

Why This Boy Started Helping His Sister With Chores: #15Girls

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Pakistani women queue to cast their ballots last month at a polling station during local government elections in Lahore, one of the country's biggest cities. In other areas, local tradition can prevent women from voting. JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov