women's rights women's rights

Mehnaz (center) is one of 12 female lawyers in an administrative district with 700,000 people. There are about 500 male lawyers in the district. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

'I Want Women To Have Rights Like Men,' Says Lawyer In Pakistan's Swat Valley

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Chinese President Xi Jinping visits the Marxist literature center at Peking University, long a bastion of patriotic student activism, in Beijing on Wednesday. Xi has pushed China's universities to enforce ideological conformity and avoid discussing constitutional democracy, civil society and judicial independence. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

For 45 years, Susan B. Anthony traveled the U.S. relentlessly, stumping for women's rights. She endured ridicule, was hanged in effigy and faced many horrid meals on the road. Nevertheless, she persisted. Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Corbis via Getty Images

Tunisian women gather to celebrate Women's Day on Aug. 13 in Tunis. On the same day, the country's president announced the review of a law requiring that a man receive twice the share of an inheritance as a woman. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Antonio Guterres, the newly elected United Nations secretary-general and former prime minister of Portugal, delivers remarks at U.N. headquarters on Thursday in New York City. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Mukhtar Mai has fought for justice for the past 14 years. Pakistan's Supreme Court has said it will review its own 2011 decision to uphold the acquittal of five of her attackers. Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

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Philip Reeves/NPR

Majd kept a journal about a time in her life when she was torn between getting married or going to school. Courtesy of Madj hide caption

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Courtesy of Madj

Diary Of A Saudi Girl: Karate Lover, Science Nerd ... Bride?

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Egypt's justice ministry says it will begin strictly enforcing a law requiring foreign men to pay to marry a woman 25 years younger or more. Human rights groups say the law only bolsters a business that preys on the poor and the vulnerable. George Peters/Getty Images hide caption

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George Peters/Getty Images

Does Egypt's Law Protect 'Short-Term Brides' Or Formalize Trafficking?

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Aniket Sathe, 15, is in a program that's trying to persuade India's boys to treat girls as their equals. Here he's pictured with his younger sister, Aarati, 12, waiting for the rain to stop before walking her to school. Poulomi Basu / VII Photo/for NPR hide caption

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Poulomi Basu / VII Photo/for NPR

Why This Boy Started Helping His Sister With Chores: #15Girls

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Pakistani women queue to cast their ballots last month at a polling station during local government elections in Lahore, one of the country's biggest cities. In other areas, local tradition can prevent women from voting. JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov

Members of the women's suffrage movement prepare to march on New York's Wall Street in 1913, armed with leaflets and slogans demanding the vote for women. Paul Thompson/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Thompson/Getty Images

Fatima Haidari, second from the right, and her bike riding club caught the attention of Humans of Kabul — the Afghanistan version of the popular Humans of New York blog. David Fox/Courtesy of Humans of Kabul hide caption

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David Fox/Courtesy of Humans of Kabul