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Plumber Zakiyyah Askia welds pipes at a high-rise residence under construction in Chicago on Jan. 24. U.S. employers added 196,000 jobs in March, a rebound from February's weak growth, the Labor Department said Friday. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP

House labor committee Chairman Bobby Scott, D-Va., has shepherded through his committee a bill that would gradually raise the federal minimum wage to $15 from $7.25 by 2024. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Images of President Trump and former President Barack Obama are on television as traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Will Lambek, left, interprets for Enrique Balcazar, a Migrant Justice activist who helped negotiate the fair labor and living standards agreement with Ben & Jerry's. John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio

The job market is booming and the economy is expanding. But wage growth hasn't kept pace, which has many economists puzzled. Adam Glanzman/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Glanzman/Getty Images

Solving The 'Wage Puzzle': Why Aren't Paychecks Growing?

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The Service Trades Council Union, a six-union coalition representing 38,000 Disney World workers, says what The Walt Disney Co. is doing is illegal. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Getty Images

Disney Says Promised Bonus Depends On Workers Signing Wage Contract

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Striking McDonald's restaurant employees lock arms during nationwide "Fight for $15 Day of Disruption" protests. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Wages Are Increasing, But What's Behind It?

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A man speaks with a potential employer Sept. 13 at a job fair in Hartford, Conn. Recent wage gains reflect the steady healing of the labor market since the worst of the Great Recession. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A cashier counts money at a Toys "R" Us in Los Angeles last November. A pinch in earnings and hours disappointed those looking for a pickup in paychecks last month. Liz O. Baylen/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Liz O. Baylen/LA Times via Getty Images

Amanda Durio, 31, is a union carpenter. She plans to caucus for Bernie Sanders because she likes his message on "race" and "social classes." Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

Ellsworth Ashman lost his middle-skill job at Entenmann's on Long Island, N.Y., last year. Now he's working at a job that pays half of what he made at the bakery. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

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Charles Lane/WSHU

Despite Recovery, Middle-Wage Workers Are Being Squeezed Out

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Aetna announced one of its largest pay hikes recently. CEO Mark Bertolini says he believes it largely could pay for itself by making workers more productive. Courtesy of Aetna hide caption

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Courtesy of Aetna

Health Insurer Aetna Raises Wages For Lowest-Paid Workers To $16 An Hour

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McDonald's announced this week that it will pay workers in its company-owned stores $1 more per hour than the local minimum wage. Wal-Mart, Target and the parent company of Marshalls and TJ Maxx have also promised to boost wages for their lowest-paid workers this year. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

While Pay Holds Steady For Most, Low-Wage Workers Get A Boost

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Oakland Kids Get A Raise From The New Minimum Wage

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