Elon Musk Elon Musk

SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk, left, shakes hands with Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, right, on Monday, after announcing that he will be the first private passenger on a trip around the moon. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

People look at cars at a Tesla showroom in New York City. Tesla CEO Elon Musk, reportedly under scrutiny by federal regulators for earlier statements, says Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund is looking to diversify away from oil with a bigger investment in the electric car company. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk is considering taking the company private, saying it would be less distracting that the "enormous pressure" of meeting quarterly financial targets. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

8 Years After Going Public, Elon Musk Wants To Take Tesla Private

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An autonomous tank is demonstrated in France last month. Leading researchers in artificial intelligence are calling for laws against lethal autonomous weapons. They also pledge not to work on such weapons. Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images

Elon Musk said that "the fault is mine and mine alone," as he apologized to a British diver who had criticized Musk's offer of help in rescuing 12 boys and their soccer coach in northern Thailand. Musk had called him a "pedo," or pedophile. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/Getty Images

Tesla CEO Elon Musk called a British diver involved in the rescue of the Thailand soccer team "a pedo guy" on Twitter after the diver criticized the billionaire's minisubmarine plan. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

An artist's rendering shows the design of an "electric skate" vehicle that the Boring Company says could travel up to 150 mph and whisk passengers to and from Chicago's O'Hare Airport in minutes. The Boring Company hide caption

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The Boring Company

Elon Musk speaks at the International Astronautical Congress on Sept. 29 in Adelaide, Australia. On Wednesday, the Tesla CEO took analysts and the media to task. Mark Brake/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Brake/Getty Images

Elon Musk To Analysts: Stop With The 'Boring, Bonehead Questions' On Tesla

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The contrail from a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is seen from Long Beach, Calif., more than 100 miles southeast from its launch site, the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Friday. Javier Mendoza/AP hide caption

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Javier Mendoza/AP