Tijuana Tijuana

Deana Quczada of Honduras has been camping with her young children on the street in Tijuana for several days. Going back to the violence in her home country is not an option, she says. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kirk Siegler/NPR

Central American asylum-seekers ride a bus to Tijuana on Wednesday, while passing through San Luis Rio Colorado along the U.S.-Mexico border. Hundreds of immigrants, the remnants of a caravan of Central Americans that began almost a month ago, set out on the last leg of their journey north in Mexico. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

It's hard to find a place in Mexico more transformed by the North American Free Trade Agreement than Tijuana. The border city has exploded in growth since the trade pact was signed in 1993. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As Trump Threatens To Ditch NAFTA, Tijuana Residents Face Uncertainty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514365621/514365622" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chantale Joseph (background) and Fausta Castillo Hernandez prepare Haitian food in Lonchería Dulce, a small luncheonette in Tijuana, Mexico. Joseph speaks French; Hernandez, who owns the eatery, speaks Spanish. Still, the two manage to cook together and call each other amiga fondly. Alex Zaragoza for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Zaragoza for NPR

Eduardo Gonzalez is HIV positive. His mother died of AIDS; his father, who's HIV positive, is in jail. The boy lives at Eunime, a Tijuana facility for children whose parents have faced AIDS in their family and who may themselves be infected. Courtesy of Malcolm Linton hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Malcolm Linton

Chef Javier Plascencia finds inspiration for his dishes at the Mercado Hidalgo, a huge indoor market in Tijuana Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor/Getty Images

Chef Tempts Tourists Back To Tijuana By Focusing On The Food

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155298652/155313311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript